J-Off Pounds the Table - Offense

j-off-her-doll

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Quick note, the point of this exercise is to find value. When I say that a player is worth selecting in the 3rd RD, for example, it doesn't mean that I would target him in the 3rd. By building a list of players I like better than their projected slots, the hope is that some of the players fall to their projected slots, and in these situations, if we're right, we're extracting more value. With that said, please let me know if you have any questions, and enjoy :brewskis:



QB – Deshaun Watson * Can he read the entire field? Are the high-INT totals a concern? Is his arm strong enough? We won’t even consider the assaults on his accuracy. Watson plays with championship poise, is a fearless and world-class leader, and he moves the ball with exceptional consistency. He knows how to use what he does well to put pressure on a defense. He’s an aggressive downfield thrower, and he throws with excellent touch. He’s also the best QB in the draft at varying his trajectory. He’s like a less athletic Marcus Mariota in many ways, but he separates himself from Mariota (in my estimation) with his ability to throw open WR’s down the field/his willingness to give his WR’s a chance to make a play. You absolutely desire this trait in an NFL QB. Alex Smith lacks this trait, and it’s the primary reason KC will be a long shot to compete for a SB as long as he is QB. It leads to some INT’s, which are more like punts, but it also leads to big plays, pass-interference calls, and it stretches out the D, which makes his ability to pick up first downs with his legs even more dangerous.

Projected as a 1[SUP]st[/SUP] or 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] RD player, Watson is a better QB than the vast majority of recent top-10 picks. You don’t need a whole hand to count the exceptions. His ability to lead, his ability to keep an offense on schedule, and his ability to make big plays with his arm and feet should make him very desirable for any team that needs a QB. For a new GM like John Lynch, Watson is the kind of person and player you want carrying your future. He’s my favorite for the 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] overall selection.



QB – Jerod Evans * Put up very similar stats to Mitch Trubisky, with similar surrounding talent, in the same conference. When his feet aren’t right, his throws can sail. Like Trubisky, he also only has one year of starting experience. He possesses good bulk and functional athleticism, and when his feet are right, he throws with outstanding touch, and he varies his trajectory. He has a quick release and one of the smoothest deliveries in the draft.

Projected in the 5[SUP]th[/SUP]-6[SUP]th[/SUP] RD behind QB’s like Webb, Peterman, and Kaaya, as a developmental QB, I think Evans belongs toward, maybe at the top of this group, and he should be considered in the 3[SUP]rd[/SUP] RD. He’s tough, physical, and he throws a beautiful deep ball.



RB – D’Onta Foreman *College football’s leading rusher combines bell-cow size and breakaway speed. He blasts through arm tackles and runs with good balance. His running style is somewhat similar to Jay Ajayi’s – great pad level. He’s inexperienced as a receiver and only has one year of big-time production, but both his timed and natural athleticism alleviate some of those concerns. It also helps that he has giant hands.

Projected as low as the 4[SUP]th[/SUP] RD, Foreman possesses starting, and potential high-end, running-back traits. He belongs in the late-1[SUP]st[/SUP]/early-2[SUP]nd[/SUP] group.



RB – James Conner * Big, gliding RB with great vision, balance, and power. He looks natural, and is very efficient, catching the ball out of the backfield. One of three RB’s in the 2017 Draft to average more than 10 yards per target (McCaffrey, Mixon). Needs to improve consistency in pass pro, but he has the frame to excel in that area. Not a great athlete, but he tested similarly to Arian Foster and Jeremy Hill, so he’s athletic enough to get it done. 56 total TD’s in 39 games – 52 rushing TD’s.

Projected in the 4[SUP]th[/SUP]-5[SUP]th[/SUP] RD, Conner has starting-RB traits, and even if he falls short of that, his versatility, leadership, and football acumen will make him a valuable cog – worth drafting in the 3[SUP]rd[/SUP] RD.



RB – Aaron Jones * A shifty RB, who breaks tackles, and has shown the ability to make catches downfield, Jones runs with great balance and vision. He averaged 7.7 YPC in 2017 and 6.3 YPC for his career. His size will limit his touches in the NFL, and despite good burst and agility, his speed is only adequate. Jones should be a very appealing back-up plan to any team eyeing Christian McCaffrey.

Projected as a 6[SUP]th[/SUP]-7[SUP]th[/SUP] RD pick, Jones’ ability as a runner and receiver make him worth a look in the 4[SUP]th[/SUP].



WR – Zay Jones * Single-season and career NCAA reception leader, Jones combine polish and physical tools. He gets in and out of his breaks like a smaller receiver – thanks to his outstanding agility and technique – and he very rarely drops the ball. He’s a little thin, and his YPA and TD’s were modest, but Jones projects as a WR who can win with route running and making tough catches.

Projected toward the end of the 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] RD, Jones belongs with that first group of 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] RD players, which starts in the late-1[SUP]st[/SUP] and ends at the 54[SUP]th[/SUP] pick.



WR – JuJu Smith-Schuster
* Nothing breaks a curse like some good JuJu. When you start to believe in a USC WR, you feel like you’re making a deal with the Devil. But, look how Marquis Lee creates separation in his sleep. How can that miss, right? I know Marquis Lee didn’t work out, but look how fast Nelson Agholor is, and he’s so tough! Well, Smitch-Schuster, for his part, is a bulked up WR with big hands, adequate speed, and good agility. Because, he’s very polished and physically imposing, he’s drawn comparisons to Anquan Boldin, and they’re about the same size entering the NFL. Smith-Schuster is a very accomplished WR and a superior athlete to Boldin. He’s also two years younger than Boldin was when he entered the NFL; however, I think the comparisons are warranted. They entered the league at about the exact same size (6’1 215 and 6’1 216), and they excel in similar ways. They’re both tough, bright players who want it more than you. This is the first time since 2003 that I’ve actually liked Boldin as a comp for a player entering the NFL, but Smith-Schuster has a higher ceiling.

Projected toward the end of the 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] RD, Smith-Schuster looks as good as anyone after Corey Davis and Mike Williams, and it wouldn’t be a shock to see him outperform those two in the NFL. If he falls at all in the 2[SUP]nd[/SUP], don’t be surprised if a team that doesn’t appear to need a WR drafts him. Good teams will covet his skill set, and he belongs in the top 54.



WR – Taywan Taylor * The most productive deep threat in college football in 2016, according to PFF, Taylor closed his Western Kentucky career in dominant fashion. Over his final two seasons, he totaled 184 receptions, 3,197 yards, and 34 TD’s. While his route tree is somewhat limited, he comes in and out of his breaks as well as any WR in the draft. He possesses solid size and length, and I’ve seen comps to Emmanuel Sanders and Greg Jennings, but his play style reminds me more of Antonio Brown. His COD is as good as you’ll find.

Projected in the 3[SUP]rd[/SUP] RD, and outside the top 100, Taylor belongs in the top 54. He can dominate a game from the slot or outside. At 203lbs, with 32”+ arms, Taylor has the body to carry his skill and athleticism into the NFL. He creates separation at will.



WR – Josh Reynolds *A dynamic playmaker, who can separate, high point the ball, and break away after the catch, Reynolds totaled 2,788 yards and 30 TD’s in three seasons at Texas A&M despite poor QB play. He’s light, with relatively short arms and small hands, but Reynolds combination of burst and agility see him beat the defender to the spot on a consistent basis.

Projected as a 5[SUP]th[/SUP] RD pick, Reynolds belongs in the top 54. He’s a versatile WR, who can make plays anywhere on the field, and score from anywhere on the field. He’ll need to add strength and weight, but he’s still pretty young, 22.



WR – Jehu Chesson * Projected as by many as a player who would blossom into a 1[SUP]st[/SUP] or 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] RD WR in 2016, Chesson never made that step, and his numbers went the wrong way with a new QB. Injury during 2016 bowl game contributed to poor connection with new QB. Physically, Chesson has everything you look for in a WR. He’s 6’3, 204lbs, with 33”+ arms. He’s fast, agile, and he has excellent burst. He also contributed on Special Teams (blocked a punt against Ohio St in 2015), so his athleticism will be a welcome addition.

Projected as a 7[SUP]th[/SUP]-UDFA, Chesson should be considered in the 4[SUP]th[/SUP] or 5[SUP]th[/SUP] RD. His value on special teams mitigates his risk, and understanding his situation and athletic gifts, he’s a good candidate to blossom as a receiver in the NFL.



TE – David Njoku * Dynamic athlete with long arms for an OT, Njoku is among the best RAC TE’s you’ll ever see. He can take a 5-yard pass 80 yards. His blocking needs work, but his length and strength should provide outstanding building blocks. Because of his burst, size, and length, he’s almost impossible to single cover, and he’s relatively developed as a receiver – despite concentration drops.

Projected anywhere from the teens to the twenties of the 1[SUP]st[/SUP] RD, Njoku is a top-10 talent. He’s right there with OJ Howard as the best talent in the draft at the position. Pick your flavor, but they’re both star talents. Njoku is the more experienced receiver with better length and athletic upside, and he’s about a year and a half younger than Howard.



TE – Evan Engram * Speaking of match-up nightmares, Engram, as an athlete, is like a cross between former Mississippi WR Donte Moncrief and Devin Funchess. He’s the best seam threat in the draft, and his RAC is outstanding. As a player, he’s like Jordan Reed with deep-threat speed. Despite his size, he’s a high-effort blocker, and he shows good technique and core strength. He has adequate length (arms are a quarter inch shorter than Howard’s) and big hands (10”, same as Njoku and Howard).

Projected as a 1[SUP]st[/SUP] or 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] RD pick, Engram should be drafted in the top 20. For a team in need of slot or H-back, Engram’s speed and overall athleticism in conjunction with his size and refinement present all kinds of problems for opposing defenses. Whether your offense needs to move the chains or it needs big plays, Engram has you covered.



TE – Bucky Hodges *Outstanding combination of size and athleticism, Hodges presents a raw player with decent production, and a very high ceiling. He moves like a WR, and, unfortunately, he’s softer than most WR’s, which leads one to question whether he’ll ever have the toughness to play TE. Given his talent and relative youth, 22, he’s worth a relatively early gamble.

Projected in the 5[SUP]th[/SUP] RD, Hodges’ physical gifts should see him go in the top 54. TE is a highly developmental position, where physical tools often make the ultimate difference. And, even if he’s never tough enough to make it at TE, he should develop into a problematic WR. Outside of arm length, he’s superior in every way to Kelvin Benjamin as a physical specimen.



TE – Pharaoh Brown * With the most impressive frame in this loaded class, Brown just needs an inch to be wide open. If you’re on his left hip, and the QB can put it on his right shoulder – or anywhere over there – you don’t have a prayer of impacting the catch. He’s smooth coming in and out of his breaks and a natural athlete. He had a serious injury, minor miracle that he’s even playing, and he comes with some character concerns, but this is a huge, natural target for a QB, with high upside as a blocking TE.

Projected as not even a UDFA, Brown is worth a look in the 5[SUP]th[/SUP]. He carries some risk, but no TE provides a better target for the QB over the middle. Brown is not sudden, but he’s a silky athlete who gets where he needs. His game reminds me of Martellus Bennett.



OG – Forrest Lamp * All Pro talent as an OG, Lamp is strong, athletic, and technically sound. He plays with great poise and rarely overextends himself. He should excel in zone or man-blocking schemes, and he gives OC’s a lot of versatility in what they ask of him. He was a dominant OT at the college level – even against high-level competition like Alabama.

Projected in the 20-50 range, Lamp belongs in the top 20. He’s one of the best bets in the draft, and while he does not play a premium position, high-end OG’s are much more difficult to find than high-end WR’s, and they’re more critical to the success of an offense. Lamp moves the needle.



OG – Ben Braden * Huge, fast, mauling OL who projects to OG in the NFL. He does possess OT length, but his agility is less than ideal for the position. Still, he could fill in at RT in a pinch. He projects best in man-blocking schemes, where he can use his size and force to maul.

Projected in the 5[SUP]th[/SUP] RD, Braden shows the strength, technique, and athleticism to start early in the NFL. Because of his size/speed combination, his ceiling is pretty high. He’s worth drafting in the 3[SUP]rd[/SUP]. For teams that miss out on Lamp, Johnson, and Feeney, Braden is not far behind Moton as the premium consolation prize at OG.



OG – Aviante Collins *Elite combination of speed and strength, he held his own at OT, but he should transition inside in the NFL. He lacks OT length, and his weight is a real concern. It’s less of a concern for zone-blocking schemes, who will love his athleticism, and his strength also helps alleviate some of that concern. Consistently in the right position, and rarely off balance, Collins plays like a natural athlete.

Projected in the 6[SUP]th[/SUP]-7[SUP]th[/SUP] RD, Collins’ talent should see him drafted as one of the top developmental OG’s – in the 4[SUP]th[/SUP] or 5[SUP]th[/SUP] RD.



OT – Storm Norton *Outstanding frame – weight, arm length, hand size, wingspan are all what you want. High-end agility. He needs to improve his upper-body strength, is a little taller than ideal, and he doesn’t possess ideal burst, but he runs well, and his agility is his best athletic trait, which translates directly to OT. He is somewhat similar to Jack Conklin in that he looks a little awkward, but he actually moves very well, and he carries out his assignments with precision. Outstanding feet, and he knows how to use his length to his advantage.

Projected in the 6[SUP]th[/SUP], Norton can play as soon as he’s strong enough, which could be as a rookie. He carries relatively minor concerns, from a developmental standpoint, and he brings elite traits to the table. He’s a solid value in the 3[SUP]rd[/SUP].
 
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SF Dolphin Fan

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That's a great list. Thanks for all the write-ups.

There are a couple of offensive players that could really sway my defense, defense and more defense philosophy for this draft.

One is David Njoku. I know this may seem like a very odd comparison, but with the ball in his hands he reminds me of Jerry Rice with his physical play and ability to break tackles. Rice would consistently take those short passes and get 8, 12, 15 yards or more. I really believe Njoku could be a superstar in Adam Gase's offense. Whether he makes it to #22 and if Miami would take him is the question. But he certainly fits the role of a potential difference maker.

The other for me is more of a mid round pick, maybe that #97 spot. I love D'Onta Foreman as a power back to pair with Jay Ajayi and Kenyon Drake. Talk about wearing down a defense.

Obviously, the Dolphins need to find a starting caliber guard pretty early so I think it's more possible that the team looks fifth round or later for a tight end maybe Pharaoh Brown. Running back may not be picked at all, but maybe James Conner if he's still around in the fifth.
 

j-off-her-doll

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That's a great list. Thanks for all the write-ups.

There are a couple of offensive players that could really sway my defense, defense and more defense philosophy for this draft.

One is David Njoku. I know this may seem like a very odd comparison, but with the ball in his hands he reminds me of Jerry Rice with his physical play and ability to break tackles. Rice would consistently take those short passes and get 8, 12, 15 yards or more. I really believe Njoku could be a superstar in Adam Gase's offense. Whether he makes it to #22 and if Miami would take him is the question. But he certainly fits the role of a potential difference maker.

The other for me is more of a mid round pick, maybe that #97 spot. I love D'Onta Foreman as a power back to pair with Jay Ajayi and Kenyon Drake. Talk about wearing down a defense.

Obviously, the Dolphins need to find a starting caliber guard pretty early so I think it's more possible that the team looks fifth round or later for a tight end maybe Pharaoh Brown. Running back may not be picked at all, but maybe James Conner if he's still around in the fifth.
Thank you, SF! Njoku's RAC ability is exciting, and if there is a run on pass rushers (seems unlikely but plausible), I would support selecting Njoku at 22. Like you, I prefer D, but Njoku has star power, and if there isn't a comparable defender available, you go with talent.

I'm a fan of having multiple RB's that can wear down a D with physicality. I don't know if that fits Gase's vision, but I'd love to see Ajayi paired with another punishing RB. Foreman gives you more of a HR threat, but I think Conner would work well, too, and I'd guess that Miami is at least a little hesitant to spend one of the first three picks on RB.

I'm really curious to see how Miami handles OG in the draft. Everything points to an early pick, but I have a nagging feeling that they may wait for Day 3.

I hope to have Defense posted by Thursday.
 
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Greer17

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If we could pick up Njoku at 22 and somehow grab Ben Braden and Aviante Collins on day 3, I would be thrilled. I just hate going after linemen in the first round when NE is able to pick up all of their line in the later rounds and even UDFA's.
 

fininpsl

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Great write up! Although I hope we fortify the defense primarily in the draft there are a few players on the list that I won't cry about drafting. Lamp, Njoku, and Taylor among them.
 
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SF Dolphin Fan

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Thank you, SF! Njoku's RAC ability is exciting, and if there is a run on pass rushers (seems unlikely but plausible), I would support selecting Njoku at 22. Like you, I prefer D, but Njoku has star power, and if there isn't a comparable defender available, you go with talent.

I'm a fan of having multiple RB's that can wear down a D with physicality. I don't know if that fits Gase's vision, but I'd love to see Ajayi paired with another punishing RB. Foreman gives you more of a HR threat, but I think Conner would work well, too, and I'd guess that Miami is at least a little hesitant to spend one of the first three picks on RB.

I'm really curious to see how Miami handles OG in the draft. Everything points to an early pick, but I have a nagging feeling that they may wait for Day 3.

I hope to have Defense posted by Thursday.
Miami was an entirely different team when they ran the ball successfully. I think that's where Adam Gase's heart is. He would love to have other options on offense, obviously, but if he could pound teams and keep the defense fresh I think that would be his number one goal. Guess you could say that about a lot of teams.

But, it's just so hard to get depth in today's NFL. The Dolphins have so many needs, really, that getting a running back is probably not likely.

I really look forward to your defensive write-ups. I've been looking at a lot of highlights and would love to hear your thoughts on Rivers among others.
 

ckparrothead

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Great list. Some definite overlap between us on some of these.

I did a similar exercise recently where I looked at the CBS rankings and took everyone from #145 (5th round) onward, and decided which plays I simply HAVE to have in my portfolio at that price. A 5th, 6th, 7th round pick is nothing if you're going by chart value. You could flip off assets to get as many of those as you want, provided you find willing partners.

The idea was, if I were to be co-GM with someone, you could do whatever you want on Day 1 and Day 2, but just give me the ammunition on Day 3 to pick up the following players and you'd be immensely happy.

Here is that list, listed in order of CBS's rankings (not my own):

#158 DE Tanoh Kpassagnon, Villanova
#167 OG Ben Braden, Michigan
#177 WR Josh Reynolds, Texas A&M
#179 TE Jeremy Sprinkle, Arkansas
#202 S Delano Hill, Michigan
#228 OG Aviante Collins, TCU
#252 LB Samson Ebukam, Eastern Washington
#289 DT Grover Stewart, Albany State
#411 WR DeAngelo Yancey, Purdue
#501 WR Jalen Robinette, Air Force
#548 RB LeShun Daniels Jr., Iowa

The bottom line is, I'm positive that each one of these players have NFL traits.

Something I wrote up elsewhere on the group:

I'm positive that Delano Hill can play, but will he be a star safety? I don't know that. I've said from the start, he's Isa Abdul-Quddus. That's who he is. IAQ was not a star for us, necessarily. But he was a good player we were glad to have. He got $4 million from us in the year he was here, which is about what Duron Harmon got from NE and that's another player I'd easily compare Delano Hill to in terms of what I think he can be at the next level.

I'm positive Ben Braden can play NFL ball, and I do think he has the ability to end up among the better paid guards in the league one day. I'm thinking like a T.J. Lang ($9.5 million per year), or at worst Lang's old teammate J.C. Tretter ($5.6 million per year). Because of his unique size/athleticism and run blocking ability, we're talking a J.R. Sweezy contract ($4.8 million per year) at the very worst case, and that's if Ben Braden's pass pro ends up looking as bad as Sweezy's.

Because of his position, Tanoh Kpassagnon has the potential to end up really well paid if he pans out. Even at just a starter level, we're talking about Andre Branch's $9 million per year. If he's out there looking like Jason Pierre-Paul, which is absolutely within his reach as a player? Then we're looking at $15.5 million per year! But he could also be pegged as mostly an inside guy that can't play end, and then just sort of kick around the league like a Cornelius Washington ($3 million per year). I think a very easy comparison to make for him would be Devin Taylor, but Taylor has not yet signed a contract so it's hard to say what value Taylor himself holds.

I'm pretty positive that Jeremy Sprinkle is at least a #2 TE in this league because he's such an excellent and proven blocker with lots of blocking versatility (experience on the line and as an H-Back). I mean, I am positive that, absent some sort of mental meltdown, this dude plays in the NFL for a while. So we are talking at least a Levine Toilolo ($4 million per year). But I think he catches passes at the NFL level better than Toilolo does, and so what we're really talking about is a Dion Sims level ($6 million per year) player, with other examples being Anthony Fasano at his peak (if you adjust his past contracts for capflation) or Martellus Bennett during some of his years. I think that is probably about where Jeremy Sprinkle peaks out, though.

Grover Stewart is just not all that good yet. The comparison there is Paul Soliai on the upside. In his prime, Soliai was able to get $8 million a year out of Miami, at a time when that probably translates to like $11 million a year today. So the upside is there, and it's good. But because of how raw he is, the downside is there for him to bust right out of the league and just not get that much of a chance. It's a really wide variance.

The same is true with Aviante Collins because he will likely have to make the transition to guard, where he's not played. I think he's got tons of potential, and again down the road with his unique run blocking ability I can't see him getting less than J.R. Sweezy. But then, if he never "gets it" during his transition to guard, then he never plays, and then what? He's back at tackle, where he could just be another Lydon Murtha. The possibilities for him are pretty wide open.

And that would also be the case with wide receivers like DeAngelo Yancey, Jalen Robinette, and Josh Reynolds. In particular I think Robinette and Reynolds show "special" play making ability in their tapes, the kind that makes the extreme upside scenario possible for both of them. But that scenario is still unlikely, as nothing will be handed to them, and neither of them possesses the kind of speed that makes them "safe" to bet on at the next level. Yancey does though. I could absolutely see Yancey catching on and sticking the way that a Legedu Naanee did once upon a time, and I'm not trying to insult him at all there.

It would be easy for a team taking up Robinette to just sort of dismiss him as a slower, blocking and downfield catching specialist, to where he comes on the field and maybe gets two balls thrown up to him deep down the field, doesn't catch them because it's really hard to complete those sorts of passes no matter what your specialty is, and then his career is over before you know it. It's sad, and I'd hate to see that, but it's a strong possibility. Some team is going to have to give him a REAL chance. I don't think they'll regret it, though.
 

j-off-her-doll

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Great list. Some definite overlap between us on some of these.

I did a similar exercise recently where I looked at the CBS rankings and took everyone from #145 (5th round) onward, and decided which plays I simply HAVE to have in my portfolio at that price. A 5th, 6th, 7th round pick is nothing if you're going by chart value. You could flip off assets to get as many of those as you want, provided you find willing partners.

The idea was, if I were to be co-GM with someone, you could do whatever you want on Day 1 and Day 2, but just give me the ammunition on Day 3 to pick up the following players and you'd be immensely happy.

Here is that list, listed in order of CBS's rankings (not my own):

#158 DE Tanoh Kpassagnon, Villanova
#167 OG Ben Braden, Michigan
#177 WR Josh Reynolds, Texas A&M
#179 TE Jeremy Sprinkle, Arkansas
#202 S Delano Hill, Michigan
#228 OG Aviante Collins, TCU
#252 LB Samson Ebukam, Eastern Washington
#289 DT Grover Stewart, Albany State
#411 WR DeAngelo Yancey, Purdue
#501 WR Jalen Robinette, Air Force
#548 RB LeShun Daniels Jr., Iowa

The bottom line is, I'm positive that each one of these players have NFL traits.

Something I wrote up elsewhere on the group:
Thanks CK! Like that list a lot, and I particularly like the comments on Braden and Collins. I still haven't got to Stewart, but I've been hearing about his stock rising. Ebukam is going to be on my defensive list. Very good call.

I also considered Sprinkle and think he'd be a quality pick in the 5th.
 

ckparrothead

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Bottom line with Grover Stewart is I popped on his tape back in February, on a lark.

I did not have any special reason; nobody turned me onto him. I browse Draft Breakdown daily and when a new video pops up, I often watch. I do pay attention when the video that pops up is a guy that I've not heard of before. Know why? Because the people that contribute to Draft Breakdown, whoever did that video, was so impressed by this player that he did a video of him and posted it.

So I looked into Grover's listing and saw that he weighed in at the NFLPA bowl game at 6042 & 347 lbs, with 34" arms, kind of small hands to be honest (under 9") and a 6'8" wing span. Compelling measurements, except for the small hands. That size, you're looking almost at like a Daniel McCullers type nose tackle. Maybe not quite THAT big but you get it.

I popped on the video and was immediately BLOWN AWAY by two things. First, his frame is GOD-LIKE for that weight. The way he carries that weight is flat out UNIQUE. And such things can be very important in football. So that was the first thing that blew me away. The second thing that blew me away, and mind you we're talking about ONE SNAP of football, that's all it took for me to fall in love, was the explosiveness he showed off the snap and on the way to the quarterback at that 6'4" and 350 lbs size.

I pride myself in being able to properly contextualize explosiveness and speed. I work at it. It's really god damn hard in players that are playing FCS level football, because everyone around the player is going slow. But his explosiveness was so beyond the pale for his size, that I had no doubts in my mind about what I was seeing. I was seeing a rare combination.

I honestly don't even need to see more than that. I didn't need to see a lot with Paul Soliai, way back in the day, to know that I'd love to flip a mid-round pick off for him to take a chance. Same with Grover Stewart. All I know is the guy is being valued right now such that a crap pick would be all it takes to bring him in, and I will take a chance on that combination of frame, explosiveness, and strength at that price any day of the week. Ten times out of ten. Give him to the coaches and have them teach him the rest.

Here's the video. Just one snap, and my eval is practically done (because he's so cheap; if he were to rate higher obviously you'd need a more thorough eval).

https://youtu.be/zdmoOI-7t9o

That's it. Just the one snap.
 

ckparrothead

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As for Jeremy Sprinkle, I truly believe he's the best blocker in the class at the position. And we have seen recently in Miami how important that can be, if you have a guy like Jay Ajayi and you really want this to be the engine that drives your offense.

He's not just stout or strong or anything like that. He's such a fundamentally sound, functional, and VERSATILE blocker. That's what gets me about his blocking. In 2015 when Hunter Henry was around taking the attached formation snaps, Jeremy Sprinkle was a detached H-Back blocker. And damn good at it. Then Hunter Henry leaves for the NFL where by the way he's turning into a wonderful pro, and now Sprinkle is the attached formation blocker, and again he's wonderful at it.

O.J. Howard is a better detached formation/H-Back blocker. He's special that way. I've rarely seen a guy be that good on the move as a blocker. But Jeremy Sprinkle's blocking as an attached formation guy on the line of scrimmage, really blows O.J. Howard's blocking away. You can see it, especially if you're paying attention to which defensive players they're matching up with. And Sprinkle isn't just a strong or stout blocker that way, but a very savvy one that knows what's going on in the play.

Again this is another example of how if you want to, at a certain price tag, you can almost just stop right there and wrap up the evaluation. You don't need to see more. You know how big the dude is, you know how fast and athletic the dude is, and you know what an immensely talented blocker he is. And you also know that people are rating him 5th round (wank wank). You can stop there, far as I'm concerned.

But one of the pleasant things about Jeremy Sprinkle is that you don't have to stop there. You look into his pass catching work, and it's actually pretty good. He's got ball skills. He's got body control, and can run. And he's also got that little something extra, on top of the athletic abilities, that tell you that he's a natural looking football player that can make some football moves.
 

ckparrothead

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LeShun Daniels, Jr. is another one.

I looked at this dude before he did his pro day, where he really wowed everyone.

But those pro day results were NOT a surprise, at all. When you look into him as a player, you see his body, his build, you immediately know how he works. That's where you'll see how important football has been to him. And when it comes to pro days and such, guys who work like THAT have a tendency to harness their potential in their pro days. They train harder, and they've developed a tendency to train successfully (two different things, you can train hard but not successfully).

But on film is where you see the natural talent and skill set.

When I watched him on film I saw two things.

First, I could see why he was being ignored. Everyone are all antsy in the pantsy for guys that can block and catch the football. Despite his work ethic, he's not a very instinctively dominant blocker, and he doesn't do much in the Iowa passing game. That puts him into the very wide group of "dime a dozen" college ball carriers. A hundred of these guys come out every year so what makes YOU so special, right? On top of everything he's a guy that seemed to get superseded by Akrum Wadley this year, and Jordan Canzeri the year before, and LeShun has had a lower (though still respectable) YPC than those two each year. Starting to lose interest? So is everyone else.

But when you watch him play, you're like, wait a minute. This guy carries himself like an NFL player. This guy is built like an NFL player. This guy has the SPEED of an NFL player. He breaks tackles like an NFL player. And oh by the way he plays like a zone specialist, which has become something like 65% of all NFL run game. I mean if a guy like Shonn Greene can kick around the league for a number of years, why in the hell wouldn't this guy be able to do the same??? Especially knowing how hard he works and how seriously he approaches everything.

He went ahead and had the blowout pro day I thought he might have, so he's going to get drafted I think.
 

PlexGod

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Hey Jay I was wondering what you thought about cam Robinson. Not sure if we are running a zone or power running game now but I think him over lamp would be a good idea. He's big strong just as good of a pass blocker as a lamp but it my opinion is stronger and moves guys more in the running game. He can also swing over to right tackle if we decide to let James go at the end of the year what do you think of him?
 

PlexGod

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Hey Jay I was wondering what you thought about cam Robinson. Not sure if we are running a zone or power running game now but I think him over lamp would be a good idea. He's big strong just as good of a pass blocker as a lamp but it my opinion is stronger and moves guys more in the running game. He can also swing over to right tackle if we decide to let James go at the end of the year what do you think of him?
 

j-off-her-doll

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Hey Jay I was wondering what you thought about cam Robinson. Not sure if we are running a zone or power running game now but I think him over lamp would be a good idea. He's big strong just as good of a pass blocker as a lamp but it my opinion is stronger and moves guys more in the running game. He can also swing over to right tackle if we decide to let James go at the end of the year what do you think of him?
Have him right there with Forrest Lamp as the best two OL prospects in the draft. Lamp is better, more athletic, and more polished, so I give him the edge, but Robinson has outstanding length and size for an OT, and OT is still a more premium position than OG. Robinson should also do well at OG, but if you need interior help, I'd go with Lamp. Both are legit options at 22, imo - just not my top choices.
 
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