Slimm's 2018 Quarterbacks (Seniors)

Discussion in 'NFL Draft Forum' started by TedSlimmJr, May 4, 2017.

  1. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    My goodness. Seriously. Get a look at this game from South Dakota QB Chris Streveler.



    What a deadly release.
     
  2. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    I'd love for Slimm to weigh in on whether Streveler's mechanical perversions are just too much to make it at the next level. Certainly they're there. But we've seen other perversions succeed in varying degrees.
     
  3. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    I'm not very familiar with the kid, but just from watching the game you have there I don't necessarily see any mechanical red flags...nothing that I would determine to preclude him from having a shot to be successful at the next level. That release can make up for a lot of flaws anyway, as you alluded to.

    He looks like a pretty good athlete for the position. Although one thing I don't see him do is throw to his left. That's the most difficult throw for a right hander, that's really where footwork has to be precise.

    He looks like he'd get picked off a lot to me if he played at the FBS level. Looks like he'd throw a high number of interceptions...similar to Tanner Lee.
     
  4. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    The mechanical issues I see are that he doesn't lead with his feet often enough, and the ball seems to come out at a pretty oblique angle relative to his shoulders. He's got a strong arm and quick release, but he's not getting much hip rotation, and from what I've seen in multiple games that is leading to this odd dynamic where he throws with NFL caliber zip at intermediate levels but can't consistently heft the ball at long distances (50+ yards).

    He was at Minnesota and couldn't beat Mitch Leidner, so he volunteered to make use of his athleticism by moving to wide receiver. Eventually he transferred out to South Dakota, played QB last year and this year, and so he's a little inexperienced and unrefined. I think there's enough there to want to keep working with him. He's arguably the most dominant player in FCS football right now.
     
  5. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    Yep, see what you're saying. Tries to throw all arm and doesn't get his lower body involved. Typical of a kid who's very strong in the upper body but underdeveloped strength wise in the core or lower body. Takes me back to how Brady Quinn threw the ball coming out of ND.

    Didn't know he was at Minnesota. Yeah that's saying something if he couldn't beat out Mitch Leidner in my opinion.
     
  6. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Kurt Benkert reminds me of Jim Harbaugh as a QB.
     
  7. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    I am surprised how much I like Bryan Schor of James Madison.
     
  8. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Brandon Silvers versus Bryan Schor is a really interesting battle.

    Offensively they're both doing similar things and there's a lot there to like in terms of translation, information processing, running a huddle and an offense, making calls and adjustments, etc.

    From a leadership standpoint Brandon Silvers stands out because of how he plays against opponents that should overwhelm him, like LSU this year or Clemson last year. Then again, you look at Bryan Schor and the fact he won the FCS National Championship after a near perfect playoff performance, and the guy is undefeated this year. He did beat a FBS team this year for what that's worth. And last year he scored 28 points on North Carolina. Can't exactly help it if his FCS defense decided to give up 56 points to Mitch Trubisky's squad. He's working with FCS receivers and FCS linemen against UNC's high recruits and he jumped out to a 21-14 lead on UNC in the first half.

    Brandon Silvers stands out for his ability to manipulate defenses with his eyes, and anticipate tight windows opening up. This is a key trait for him. On the other hand, Bryan Schor stands out for his ability to make plays when the play breaks down, finding guys on the scramble. That's a key trait for him.

    I would say that Brandon Silvers throws the football with a little more pepper on it, especially on the short to intermediate throws, although I would not say that's the greatest thing because his prioritization on zip sees him throwing a hard to catch football sometimes. Schor has better manipulation of touch, can get the ball up over an underneath defender and down into a zone, and throws a bit more catchable on short to intermediate distances.

    But is Schor's arm strength inferior to Silvers? I don't think so.



    You don't make that throw, which has to be something like 58 yards through the air at a dead run, rolling right and throwing across your body, and not floating the ball at all, if you've got an inferior arm.

    Silvers has a bit more of a stout build, but he's not quite as athletic as Schor, who can definitely outrun some people with his legs.

    In terms of decision-making, they can both be risky with the football at times. But when Brandon Silvers is getting caught on a bad decision, I feel like he falls into the trap a lot of guys do when they use their eyes to manipulate defenses, which is coming back to the throw they wanted and throwing into it blind. When Bryan Schor is being risky with the football, it's usually just him being aggressive down the field trying to make a play.
     
  9. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    I'm not sure about Bryan Schor or how he compares to anybody I haven't looked at him, but I want to point out the details you illustrated here in regards to Brandon Silvers are spot on. That's well done.
     
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  10. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    Benkert has physical skills that can be developed for the next level, but he's in dire need of some top notch QB coaching. He's a fundamental mess.

    However, he displays two things that you can't coach...toughness and arm talent.

    He'll stand in there until the last second and stare down the barrel of a blitzer to deliver the pass in key situations. Problem is, he's more tough than he is savvy at this point. Holds the ball too long and often takes some unnecessary punishment before deciding to throw it away....especially when his primary read isn't open.

    Gets antsy in the pocket, I'd like to see him become more calm and relay more poise to his team. Forgets to set his feet when he throws on the move which causes his accuracy and ball placement to drop off.

    Lot of details he needs to clean up in order to become a starter at the next level.

    Also needs some work on handoffs...doesn't always seat the ball properly to the back.

    He reminds me of Austin Davis coming out of Southern Miss. He may get cut a time or two in camp at first until he's able to iron out all his flaws with the right coaching and reps before eventually securing a roster spot as a backup.
     
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  11. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Nice FCS QB battle this weekend between South Dakota's Chris Streveler and Sam Houston State's Jeremiah Briscoe.

    As I've said, I favor Streveler quite a bit as a project for the next level. He's very big and strong, very athletic having a history of playing wide receiver at Minnesota. With his build, athletic ability, and toughness, you're almost tempted to throw him in at a different position. But he's been a dominant passer since joining South Dakota and he seems to be making improvements on his stroke in real time as he gets more and more game experience.

    The short explanation of why you're drawn to him would be because his release is the quickest in the game, he can throw a very hot ball with accuracy, has the patience and physical confidence to stand in the pocket and deliver the football with lots of physical threats coming at him, and then he can hurt you with his legs and physical strength.

    There's a confidence that bigger, physically strong guys sometimes have in the pocket with trash being thrown around them all over the place. He has that.

    His offense isn't anything to write home about in terms of translation, but two things I like about it are his ability get from one side of the field to the other in his reads, and his complete comfort with a blur-caliber hurry-up.

    Another thing I like is that the guy shows a natural sense for when to throw the football with charged up pace, and when to throw a very catchable ball. When I initially looked at him in 2016, I actually didn't think he had a very strong arm, but that was because I was watching throws where he was deliberately throwing catchable footballs with some arc. I mentioned that Brandon Silvers at times has taken to driving the ball so hard that it really takes away from how catchable his throws are. I would say Streveler has a better, more natural sense for when to drill it and when to throw it.

    The competitiveness with him is very high. He exudes it. South Dakota has not been a good football program over the years. But they started out the year beating an FBS team (Bowling Green) and then beating the team that played in the FCS Championship Game last year (Bo Pelini's Youngstown State). They won seven games this year which I don't think they had done as a program in over a decade. They lost steam toward the end of the season, dropping three straight against UNI, NDSU, and SDSU, but they played in the first round of the FCS Playoffs last weekend and beat Nicholls on Streveler's 25 of 37 for 378 yards, 4 TDs and 1 INT.

    The mechanics are a bit wonky at times, throwing all arm without much follow through or hip rotation. There are times when the ball comes out at a funny angle relative to his shoulder aiming. But I think you can continue to work with him on his feet, because that's where it all starts, and I think there's a possibility that a number of years from now any remaining idiosyncracies seem pretty benign.

    Clean him up just a little more and what you're left with is a guy with a lightning quick release throwing a hot ball when necessary but also having a natural feel for throwing with touch, standing in the pocket with toughness and confidence, and making plays with his legs.

    From there you're just hoping he's not absolutely clueless learning an NFL playbook, handling a huddle and protection calls, reading leverage, throwing option routes, and seeing the game at a much faster speed. That's a big leap of faith, but you could do a LOT worse than his tools and traits for a project player.
     
  12. Stills&Landry

    Stills&Landry A True Fan

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    I've been watching Riley Ferguson lately since I like his numbers, measurables, the fact he started out in TN, the offenses he has played at have been very pro-like, has experience under center, he's likely to be available later, etc, etc...

    Even in his good games, I see poor mechanics in his shorter throws mostly. He delivers the ball too far down his arc. He doesn't give his short throws much of an arc either. I think he 's trying to quicken his release but by stretching it all the way to his chest he's negating any advantage. Lots of his shorter passes get batted down because of this too. No touch either. Not a very catchable ball.

    His deep ball is money though when he sets up properly.

    He plays with urgency, is a good scrambler, stays in the pocket, while a good runner he looks to pass first and foremost, but sometimes he'll look like he's playing too fast. He's at his best when he sets but he doesn't do this enough. Good footwork though, he looks frenetic out there.

    He's a leader and a competitor, decided to transfer rather than stay at TN as a backup after getting injured.

    IMO the tools are there, both physically and mentally but will still need a lot of work with mechanics and gaining more poise in the pocket. He could add some weight, that would probably scrape some of his athletic ability but he'd be less afraid of contact and would probably need to scramble less either way.

    If given time and a good situation he could be a productive starter in the league. If forced to start in a bad team early in his career that will ruin his confidence and he'll bust as he becomes flustered.
     
  13. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    For me, Baker Mayfield and Riley Ferguson are the only two senior QBs in this draft that I could take and be relatively confident I got someone that will start games on Sunday.

    Others feel that way about Mason Rudolph. He's not for me. It isn't that I wouldn't take him at any level. It's just that I'm not likely to prioritize him until Day 3. Pretty good arm, obviously great size. But he's a big, stationary target in the pocket. Only adequate feet, slow movement within the pocket. Can't do much of anything when forced off his spot. There are guys in past drafts that I've been high on that look a lot like this (almost invariably a mistake for me to be high on them) but at least those guys had Looney Tunes arm strength and/or ridiculous accuracy at distance. Mason Rudolph earns neither accolade.

    Setting aside the underclass, I think my QB strategy would be to go for Baker Mayfield or Riley Ferguson at their market price, or if I were to swing and miss the market on those two, eschew the middling guys (Mason Rudolph, Luke Falk, Matt Linehan, Kurt Benkert, Max Browne, Jeremiah Briscoe, J.T. Barrett) in favor of Bryan Schor, Chris Streveler, Brandon Silvers, Dalton Sturm, or Logan Woodside. Probably in that order.

    That gets blown up a little when you stick the underclass in there because suddenly ou've got a guy in Josh Rosen that should probably go #1 overall. You've got guys in Josh Allen and Lamar Jackson that I'm perfectly comfortable spending a Day 2 pick on. And you've got some legit Day 3 players to add to the pile in Ryan Finley, Tanner Lee, and Clayton Thorson. I know those guys would go ahead of Silvers, Sturm, and Woodside for me. Haven't yet decided on Schor or Streveler.
     
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  14. Stills&Landry

    Stills&Landry A True Fan

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    I do like Falk, Linehan and Benkert. What do you all think of Lock?
     
  15. ANUFan

    ANUFan FinHeaven VIP Finheaven VIP Donator

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    I really like the way the Mayfield kid plays.
     
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  16. mrbunglez

    mrbunglez Reading Is Fundamental Donator

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    What’s anyone’s thoughts on Mike White out of Western Kentucky. Kids a Florida native from Ft. Lauderdale. Has pretty good stats.
     
  17. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    I watched a lot of Mike White at South Florida and I've watched a lot of him at Western Kentucky. Personally I just don't see it.
     
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  18. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    Me either
     
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  19. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    This is a quarterback that I like for the later rounds or undrafted. Take him in, take your time with him, work on the consistency of how he sets up his throws with his feet, work on his flexibility, teach him an NFL offense. It's hard to say what you could come up with because there are significant building blocks present.


    • Big, strong guy with excellent frame and musculature despite only being 6'2" tall.
    • Fast, quick feet, good ball carrying skills. His feet are a weapon the defense must account for.
    • Has played wide receiver, tight end, full back, running back. Have to be smart to move all around like that.
    • Good communication skills. Widely regarded by teammates to be the leader. Has TWO Master's degrees.
    • Easily the fastest release I've seen in the 2018 draft. His release is so quick, it's a major weapon.
    • Great natural arm strength that can get even better if he keeps working on consistency in footwork.
    • Very accurate with the football. Throws players open. Makes decisions about ball trajectory and touch.
    • Doesn't over-rely on one receiving weapon; efficient chemistry with a dozen different players.
    • An intangible physicality; absolutely not intimidated by bodies cluttering the pocket. This is a big deal.
    • Regularly gets through to his third option, can get from one side of the field to the other with timing and accuracy.
    • Keeps his eyes up while scrambling and can flick the ball on a hair trigger to the open player.
    • Ran a blazing fast no-huddle, much like Jimmy Garoppolo did at Eastern Illinois. Requires fast information processing.
    • Took a team that hadn't won more than 6 games in a decade, won 8 games, beat an FBS team, won a playoff game.
    • Tough. Played with an injured throwing hand for much of 2017. Had to start throwing with a glove.
    • Throwing Stats: 316 of 481 (66%) for 4,134 yards (8.6 YPA), 31 TDs (6.4%), 8 INTs (1.7%).
    • Rushing Stats: 168 runs, +870 positive gains, -150 negative gains (sack yardage), 11 TDs.
    If I had to really boil it down to what is so attractive with Chris Streveler, it is that he has a lot of intangibles in terms of physicality inside the pocket, leadership, intelligence, and yet he also has tangible qualities in terms of his strength, feet, ball carrying skills, arm strength, and especially that hair trigger release.

    He and Troy QB Brandon Silvers are similar in that they're not going to get overwhelmed by anyone, no matter how much you think they should be overwhelmed. With Silvers at Troy (FBS Group of Five), he's not about to be overwhelmed by LSU or even by future FBS Champion Clemson in 2016.

    With Streveler playing at a perennial loser in the FCS, turning them into a winner, he's not about to be intimidated by the FCS Championship Game runner-up (beating Bo Pellini's Youngstown State), nor by an FBS team (beating Bowling Green). He's going to carry that offense on his back, representing about 71% of the offense's yardage and 66% of its touchdowns. And if he goes down to a better team in the FCS playoffs, he's going to go down swinging, scoring 42 points of offense, accounting for 571 yards and 6 TDs on his own.

    If he doesn't have the time in the pocket to operate the offense, then he doesn't have the time in the pocket to operate the offense. There's not much to be done about that. Streveler's offensive line was NOT good. But he's not going to be overwhelmed, regardless. He's going to stand in there, make passes with guys in his face, take hits and pop back up, and even do some things with his feet to buy time and get a pass off. That snap trigger of Streveler's is a real weapon, yet his mechanics are not standard issue. That makes me compare him to a Phil Rivers.

    I really think you can do worse than a guy who is a physical specimen, has intangible qualities, the quickest release in the draft, and is intelligent enough to have accumulated two master's degrees by the time he was done with school. Even in the FCS.

    Carson Wentz was not a wholly dissimilar story coming out.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2017
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  20. ANUFan

    ANUFan FinHeaven VIP Finheaven VIP Donator

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    Is it me or does it seem like he "snaps his wrist" to throw? He doesn't seem to be using his torso/upper body on his throws..just snap the wrist and the ball is gone.
     
  21. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Correct. Not the ideal flexibility or weight transfer. An unorthodox delivery that works for him. I don't think pro coaches would try and break him down and build him back up, but I think they will keep working with him to get him consistent setting his feet before the throw, especially throws to his left, and I think that will help him curtail the more bizarre aspects of his delivery.

    I don't think it's something you're going to criticize TOO much unless the guy can't throw left or can't throw vertically, or unless he's unable to generate heat on his passes. The unorthodox style of his delivery is actually part of what makes him so attractive. He has a great pure arm, so he can throw the ball on the run, and he has the snappiest, quickest delivery in the draft.
     
  22. ANUFan

    ANUFan FinHeaven VIP Finheaven VIP Donator

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    That arm is amazing! I actually had to rewind and watch some of his throws in slow-mo because i didn't see the ball leave his hand. On a few throws i thought it was a fake where he pulled the ball back down. LOL!!!

    Good Stuff! Curious to see where his talent takes him.
     
  23. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    I think that some will think him to be another Jordan Lynch or Chandler Harnish type...not destined to make it. I think that could be a mistake, but the delivery is so unorthodox I could also see him being dismissed altogether. He's exploring the CFL and even European football leagues.
     
  24. Stills&Landry

    Stills&Landry A True Fan

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    Congrats on that Streveler kid CK. Nice find. He's a baller. I'd put him after Stidham and above Ferguson. Of course he wont go there but if Benkert is gone by our 6th I would take him there.
     
  25. mrbunglez

    mrbunglez Reading Is Fundamental Donator

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    Watching Streveler, I like his quick release although unorthodox. Wouldn’t mind taking a flier on him in the later rounds.
     
  26. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    I decided to go back and evaluate every game Kyle Kempt has played this season, and have added him among my Senior crop of quarterbacks.

    That kid gets it. His body language and decision making are so mature. Keeps your offense on schedule. Where he gets into trouble is if he has to improvise.

    In all honesty, he might be the safest bet on the entire list to have a long career as a backup in the NFL.

    He's very reminiscent of Frank Reich at Maryland. Identical size and incredible college career symmetry being buried on the depth chart. I remember the comeback Reich led against Miami in the early 80's...it looked a lot like Kempt's game against the Sooners.

    Reich of course would eventually lead the biggest comeback in NFL history against the Oilers in the playoffs. These are the types of things I could see in Kempt's future as a clipboard holder at the next level.

    If some of the other much more heralded and physically talented quarterbacks had this kid's body language and decision making, they'd literally be can't miss prospects.
     
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  27. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Right on. That's where I end up seeing him as well, career backup. He's got enough arm talent. As you say, he does not improvise well. He's prone to throwing up some ducks. But I see vested starters doing that every now and again. He's just so damned mature and won't...back...down. That's what stands out about him every time I watch, and that includes yesterday.

    The one thing is...some of these qualities we're talking about on this 6'5" guy, the circumstances, the language, the intelligence, and the profile on him...my goodness doesn't it remind you of someone else not named Frank Reich?

    That's the thing that screws me up about him because we're talking about a kid that got THE first start of his collegiate career a third of the way through 2017...and has started 9 games! He's an infant, in terms of experience level. We are sitting here talking about what he is and what he does well and doesn't do well, and you can't fault us because that forms the basis of evaluation and projection, but a guy only 9 games into his budding post-High School career COULD only just now be getting started on where he is going to end up, in terms of his decision making and even something as intrinsic as how well he spins the football.

    I happen to think that all great NFL quarterbacks are, a favorite term of Pat Riley's, "lightning bolts from God". I try not to get stuck on trying to fit molds that way, because they're all unique. But this Computer Science major strikes a few eerily similar notes for me.
     
  28. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    The four non-elite level quarterbacks that I've gravitated toward for Miami to potentially target (Riley Ferguson, Brandon Silvers, Chris Streveler, Kyle Kempt) all share a certain characteristic and that is competitive will, balls of steel, whatever you want to call it. All four of them will lead their offense into a game where they should not be competitive, and they seem to find a way to make themselves competitive.

    They're all overachievers. They've all been dealt significant setbacks in their college careers, and found a way to turn it around. I don't think it's a coincidence that their teams ended up overachieving, or finding a way to almost always be competitive even while being outplayed.
     
  29. ColoradoFin

    ColoradoFin Well-Known Member

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    My small school sleeper pick, Texas A&M-Commerce QB Luis Perez, Harlon Hill winner, put up ridiculous numbers. Might be worth a 7th round pick or sign him up as an UDFA:




    Texas A&M-Commerce's Luis Perez wins 2017 Harlon Hill Trophy
    Harlon Hill Award Committee
    Last Updated - Dec 14, 2017 13:56 EST
    Contact |Archive |RSS


    FLORENCE, Ala. -- Texas A&M University-Commerce senior quarterback Luis Perez of Chula Vista, California has claimed the 2017 Harlon Hill Trophy as the Division II College Football Player of the Year.


    Perez received 198 total points and held a commanding 63-point margin over Gannon University junior running back Marc Jones at 135. Slippery Rock University senior defensive lineman Marcus Martin nished third at 96, marking the highest finish by a defensive lineman in the award's 32-year history.

    The award winner is determined in voting by the Division II sports information directors.

    Perez, who has led Texas A&M-Commerce to a 13-1 record and into Saturday's (Dec. 16) NCAA Division II National Championship Game, was on 85 of the 106 total ballots cast. He will be just the seventh Hill winner to also play in the Division II National Championship Game in the same season that he won the award. Five of the previous Hill winners, Jeff Bentrim of North Dakota State (1986), Chris Simdorn of North Dakota State (1990), Ronnie West of Pittsburg State (1991), Ronald McKinnon of North Alabama (1995) and Curt Anes of Grand Valley State (2002) also led their teams to the national championship the day after winning the Hill Trophy. Pittsburg State's Ronald Moore (1992) is the only Hill winner to play on the losing team in the championship game.

    The Hill Trophy will be presented to Perez on Friday, January 5 at a ceremony on the campus of the University of North Alabama, Hill's alma mater.

    The Harlon Hill Trophy is sponsored by Herff Jones, the Marriott Shoals Hotel and Spa and the University of North Alabama.

    Perez has thrown for 4,678 yards and 44 touchdowns this season, while completing better than 70 percent of his pass attempts. He has completed 398 of 566 passes leads Division II in total passing yards (4,678), passing yards per game (334.0) and passing touchdowns (44). He is ranked third in points responsible for (272), sixth in points responsible for per game (19.4), sixth in total offense (329.2) and tenth in passing efficiency (161.8).
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2017
  30. Awsi Dooger

    Awsi Dooger A True Fan

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    Rudolph is better than I thought he was. I've downgraded Big 12 quarterbacks for a decade due to the defensive ineptitude in that conference. Normally it pays off. But this guy processes quicker and makes excellent downfield pro-type dagger throws. He also has very good placement on short out turning routes, enabling the receiver or back to turn and go.

    In short, everything about his game looks authoritative.

    It's true they don't explore the middle of the field, as Tannenbombs posted. That's been a Big 12 tendency for that decade. But at least the conference is not as reliant on bubble screens as it was for a half decade or more.
     
  31. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    The main reason most Big-12 offenses don't explore the middle of the field boils down to Choice/Switch. That's all it is. Fundamental concepts of the Run-and-Shoot and 4 verts concept.

    The receiver is going to make the choice to break outwards toward the sidelines or turn it into a streak if he sees inside leverage by the DB.

    Most Big-12 receivers aren't likely to make the choice to run into the middle of the field towards those waiting safeties and linebackers. They want no part of that. A really skinny skinny post is typically the best you'll get.

    Oklahoma and Iowa St. do it a little different. Both in terms of personnel package and alignment.
     
  32. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    This is Brandon Silvers, one of the guys Slimm has been putting up on his board for over a year, since before he was on anyone's radar.

    I think he's going to draw Adam Gase's eye this week because of the way he reads the field, moves the defense with his eyes, throws with anticipation. He's got NFL velocity and spin, and the confidence to really "let it go" when he rips it. There's a quality to that, a nuance. He throws it during games the way coaches at the Combine keep telling the quarterbacks to throw it, pushing the ball to the very edge of the sideline, to the very edge of the route. He can run. He's got good size. He does NFL things out there.

    They're looking for a backup, and if you're going to get tossed out there for an injured Ryan Tannehill you've got to have balls of steel. The Troy State quarterback who can go out there and give National Championship winner Clemson a run for their money, or can go out there and BEAT LSU...has balls of steel.

     
  33. NoblePhin

    NoblePhin Starter Finheaven VIP Donator

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    Here's some qualities I would like:

    Arm Strength
    Throws to spots
    Good pocket awareness/Escapability
     
  34. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Some catapult data from the practices showed that Josh Allen had the highest max rotation (710 RPMs) on the South squad, and that Brandon Silvers had the highest max rotation (770 RPMs!) on the North squad.

    That's the thing about Silvers when you watch him, he really is 100% confident in his accuracy to where he will chuck the **** out of the ball on every throw where it's appropriate. He only takes some off the rotation if it's the right thing to do from a touch standpoint.

    Believe it or not, that's not common. Most guys have sort of a comfort zone where they like to stay in order to maintain their accuracy, and it's pretty well below their max ability to drive the football. They reserve the extra torque for throws they know they need it. Brandon Silvers and Josh Allen don't do that. They believe in their arm strength and accuracy.
     
  35. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    Kyle Kempt may be returning to Iowa St. next year if they can get the petition pushed through the NCAA. They don't have an answer back yet. Wait and see.
     
  36. Manning

    Manning Scout Team

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    Damn I'm not a QB expert but this guy looks really good. Iv looked at a lot of mock drafts and haven't seen him enywhere. Why? Looks a lot better than some guys projected ahead of him like Mike White who I saw a few games of and didn't impress me one bit
     
  37. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Well he's not flashy, for one thing. He spins the hell out of the football but that doesn't mean he's got great overall velocity. Plays in a spread, takes full advantage of the whole WR screen thing (although quite honestly they do WR screens so often in the NFL that I'm not sure it matters). He doesn't really create much on his own. Sometimes he really spins and squeezes the football a little too hard and it detracts from the ball being purely catchable. Other times he's caught making a decision too soon, focusing on execution without even looking at the leverage of the defensive players in coverage to see if he should come off it. For example he'll use his eyes to draw one defender away from his true target and then click over and chuck it to that target without checking to see if he's actually open. It happens to a lot of guys, but it's a recurring theme for Silvers. Also sometimes not seeing the underneath defender in position to rob the passing lane.

    Overall he belongs in a lane of QB prospects that can't really make a lot of plays on their own, hurting a defense with their own pure ability, but rather would have to be great by achieving execution savant status within their offensive system, or within the structure of what defenses do to try and stop him or his offense. I think that's hard to do. Guys like DeShaun Watson, Carson Wentz, Matt Stafford, Russell Wilson, young Tony Romo, young Drew Brees, Aaron Rodgers, young Ben Roethlisberger, Andrew Luck, Cam Newton, and then to some extent even guys like Blake Bortles, Tyrod Taylor, and Alex Smith, they're generally going to have an easier time of it because of their ability to create with elusiveness and play-making talent.

    But you are starting to see some counter-punching from the execution class, as the likes of Kirk Cousins, Jared Goff, Jimmy Garoppolo, Case Keenum, and Andy Dalton have begun joining the ranks of your classical Peyton Manning, Tom Brady, Eli Manning, Phil Rivers, Matt Ryan types that make their hay in the NFL by being execution savants despite never really having ever been elusive or pure "play makers".
     
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  38. Lovethefish

    Lovethefish Well-Known Member

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    This is really great analysis in terms of distinguishing QB styles. I guess I'm putting Tannehill somewhere in between the two.
    Maybe another reason the most of the fan base is ambivalent towards him.
     
  39. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Tannehill has the athleticism and speed of a play-making quarterback, but not the elusiveness or physical spatial awareness. However, he has superb ability to make big throws while on the move. That's the thing that helps him.

    I mention the frequency with which Josh Allen puts out these A+ highlights. Thing is, Ryan Tannehill has A+ highlights that could go on the same reel. That's because the same athletic ability is there, and even a close approximation of the same arm strength and ability to throw on the move. It just happens less frequently. But on the plus side, Tannehill executes the vanilla play call about as well as anyone.
     
  40. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    I find it hard to believe there's not more push for Matt Linehan in this crop of Senior QB's.

    Not sure what these scouts are doing, but somebody needs to look more closely at him. I think the general draft public is missing something here.

    I didn't like C.J. Beathard as a prospect, but Linehan resembles Beathard in many ways. Watch his game against Missouri. This kid knows where to go with the football.
     

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