Slimm's 2019 Quarterbacks (underclassman)

Discussion in 'NFL Draft Forum' started by TedSlimmJr, May 1, 2018.

  1. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    Little bit of overstride, which results in a follow through that looks a lot like a pitcher coming off the mound with all his weight going towards home plate.

    Overstriding is more of a symptom, and an end result than a cause. Footwork is what starts the chain reaction.

    He doesn't always get his lead toe pointed at the target. A lot of times his lead foot is planted perpendicular to the target, which causes the over rotation of the shoulders because his left hip can't clear, causing him to have to lift his back leg so high, which causes a loss of neutral spine angle...which causes an off balance follow through.

    When he gets his lead toe pointed at the target, he typically makes a much more accurate throw and has better balance.

    Footwork dominates everything you do in any position in any sport. His needs work.
     
  2. Birdmond

    Birdmond A True Fan Donator

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    We’ll be talking about Joey Burrow now that he’s transferred to LSU. I’d also be willing to bet both Burrows and Dywane Haskins will be eventual first round picks. Meyer was in love with JT Barrett and there was never an open competition. Both Burrows and Haskins are special football players.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2018
  3. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Just as a general observation, he's prone to sleepy feet. That's the danger with the tall guys. He doesn't seem to want to ever point his toe when he's throwing left, though he does a much better job of it when he's throwing right or particularly right hash. You'll notice the proportion of him getting his feet in order is higher when he's throwing right than throwing left. The more obtuse or acute the throw, the more he's prone to getting the feet wrong.

    But you have to keep in mind you're trying to nail a moving target, not a stationary one. Fast forward to his time after the knee injury, after watching Drew Anderson light it up in that offense as a pocket passer. He had been running the football 9 or 10 times per four quarters prior to injury. After the injury I think he ran twice in four games. No more huffing and puffing as he gets everyone lined up.

    He had a lot more care with his footwork by the Ohio game than he did the Minnesota game. By then he's double tapping his lead foot to get his toe out front even when he's throwing left. He's conscious of the toe. You can tell. Before it wasn't even something he thought about. You can see more jitter and stutter in his feet from the backfield as he's scanning the field, as that neural connection between his feet and his eyes starts coming along more and more. He's not there yet, but it's coming.

    He's just got to stay on top of all that because you can tell there are times when the chaos around him in the pocket pulls his focus away from the feet, and then he's back to just trying to get the football out mode.

    Sometimes sitting and watching another guy do it can be the best thing for you and that certainly appeared to be the case for Tyree Jackson. He's now on the right track, developing the right way, and I think it's pretty exciting for him as a prospect.

    I'm really not too worried about the feet, the follow through, the weight transfer, etc. That stuff is getting better and the trajectory is on target. I'm more worried about the information processing, hesitation, tendency to get stuck on something, and the way he moves within the pocket. Those are the things he needs to ramp up most fiercely to be where he wants to be.
     
  4. Nappy Roots

    Nappy Roots Da Dalphins

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    Yea. For being a guy that can run, hes got some concrete in his shoes. You seem sometimes when he plants that back foot and reads the field, that back foot will not continue to work. I see Rivers do this quite a bit. Why Rivers throws from so many awkward positions.
     
  5. Tannenbombs

    Tannenbombs FinHeaven VIP Finheaven VIP

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    I just watched CKs Drew Anderson YouTube video. Based off that, I would give him a late 2nd/3rd round grade. What do you guys think?
     
  6. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    The grade is an INC for me because I'm not sure you can grade him on the four games alone.

    If I were forced to head into a draft with no more information then yeah, 2nd to 3rd round is where I'd start looking, depending on market price.

    But it all comes with a caveat. If he played 12 more games exactly the way he played those 4 games, then he's a 1st rounder. So that's why I say he's an INC.
     
  7. Tannenbombs

    Tannenbombs FinHeaven VIP Finheaven VIP

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    Slimm,

    I know he's only thrown 77 passes, but based on what you've seen how would you compare Tua to the top QB prospects in the last 10 years?
     
  8. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    Tua is special in the playmaker category. And he throws with an elite level of anticipation. I'm not going to get too detailed yet.

    The throw he made to win the national championship against UGA was the most clutch throw any quarterback has ever made in Alabama history. The Snake, Namath, Bart Starr...that throw beat em all.

    It was probably the most clutch play period in Alabama history that I've ever seen. It surpassed the Goal Line Stand against Penn St. in '79.
     
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  9. Phinatic8u

    Phinatic8u Please football gods, grace us Tua or Trevor Finheaven VIP

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    No not at all, although those guys help LOL.
     
  10. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    I think Alex Thomson may be real, not just hype. This is impressive.
     
  11. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    What's interesting is that I think a lot of people would be tempted to sort of disregard Slimm's separate "Athlete" list with Armani Rogers and Khalil Tate.

    But those two guys have special talent, might be two of the purest talents on the entire list.

    This isn't like watching Quinton Flowers be a special runner that can't really throw the football consistently to save his life.

    Both of those guys at very YOUNG ages are absolutely DYNAMIC with their combination of feet and arm talent, and perhaps just as importantly, they translate their quick feet into their footwork and pocket management.

    Khalil Tate was only 18 years old when he jumped into the Colorado game to replace the injured starter and proceeded to shatter the single game FBS record for QB rushing yards. He finished the year with 8.9 yards per attempt, 62.5% completion, and shows remarkable control on the football. He throws with touch. He can throw to anywhere from anywhere, any which way he wants it to go. He throws on a rope when he needs to, he gets air when he needs to, and he makes it all look EASY (which it's not). He's got a fantastic background, legit 4.40 type speed (I've watched him pull away from guys that ran 4.51 with all the jump/agility measures to support that speed), elusiveness both inside and outside the pocket (only 9 sacks on 187 drops).

    But Armani Rogers is nearly as compelling. Watch him play on a foundering ship against Ohio State. I don't care what the stats say for that game. There were neither accuracy nor decision making issues in that game. The defensive front of Ohio State were on him like an avalanche but he hit them with strikes, and he showed his elusiveness and talent. Unlike a guy I've gone on about Tyree Jackson, who also has a combination of size, speed, and arm strength, Armani Rogers actually operates his feet and arm with legit quickness that could help him translate. He moves and slides his feet in his drop like a pro, and this belies quick eyes and quick field reading ability. I would place him significantly ahead of Tyree Jackson on that basis. But his accuracy definitely goes streaky from what I've seen. He was only 19 years old for the entire season he started at UNLV so he has some growing to do.

    I would flip the order just because I think Khalil Tate, despite being shorter, is a more dynamic talent both throwing and running the football, but the simple fact of the matter is both of those guys beat the pants off many of the guys sitting on that more classic list of pocket passers.
     
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  12. SCLSU Mud Dogs

    SCLSU Mud Dogs (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻ Finheaven VIP Donator

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    It is also worth noting that the quarterback you have listed last on this list was rated only behind Baker Mayfield in many passing metrics.
     
  13. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    And also worth noting, as he did in the original post, that the player is LISTED at 5'11" and 185 lbs, and may be more like 5'10" and 180 lbs soaking wet.

    We've been through this before with Rakeem Cato, who I adored, but who was never going to get a fair shake in the NFL at 6001 and 178 lbs.

    Rakeem had some emotional/developmental hangups that I'm not sure Milton has or does not have. Then again, Milton has a low release point and his structural mechanics put way too much pressure on his elbow, which is probably going to wear out quickly if he keeps going this way, especially as he takes a bunch of hits.
     
  14. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    Milton had a great season in Scott Frost's offense. But he's a longshot to ever take a meaningful snap as a starter in the NFL.

    I don't evaluate players for the CFL.
     
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  15. SCLSU Mud Dogs

    SCLSU Mud Dogs (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻ Finheaven VIP Donator

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    He definitely does have a funny release. But he's not the first or the last player to have a strange release/motion. Philip Rivers is one player that comes to mind that has always had a strange release point and throwing motion.

    But agreed about the height. Even with the height limitations I could see him ending up in a training camp somewhere and having to prove himself that way.
     

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