Does Anyone Know Why Are These Positions Listed Under Football Administration

Ray R

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I found the following positions listed under Football Administration and I wonder why?

*Director, Personnel Analytics: Eugene Shen
(what are personnel analytics and who uses them?)

*Director, Sports Nutrition: John Parentl
(we didn't have one last year, to my knowledge)

*Manager, Coaching Analytics: Max Mulitz
(what are coaching analytics and who uses them?)

*Coordinator, Sports Science: Adam Lachance
(What does this position do and who uses the information)

*Assistant to Head Coach: Lance Bennet
(A job description for this position would be useful)

*Coaching Assistant: Charles Burks
*Coaching Assistant: Shawn Flaherty
(Who do these assistants assist?)

*Strength - Conditioning Assistant: Jimmy Mandiero
(Why isn't he listed along with our other strength and conditioning coach Jim Arthur?)

Any information would be valued and any opinion is probably at least as good as what I'm coming up with.
 

jazz015

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The patriots were using analytics long before it was mainstream. Their use can be tied to certain situations (red zone, 3rd down playcalls). Personnel can be seen as favored formations in certain situations. Its a way to gameplan by using an opponents tendencies to predict their next moves.
 

Ray R

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The patriots were using analytics long before it was mainstream. Their use can be tied to certain situations (red zone, 3rd down playcalls). Personnel can be seen as favored formations in certain situations. Its a way to gameplan by using an opponents tendencies to predict their next moves.
Yes, but I'm wondering about the specifics we are evaluating and what we are trying to learn. Once we have this specific information, who determines what we do with it.

If we are evaluating the players, why aren't we doing it under the coaching staff?

If we are evaluating the coaching, again, why aren't we doing it via the coaching staff? I could see why the football administration would be evaluating a coach's performance, but those evaluations probably do not require "coaching analytics". I would interpret "coaching analytics" as being used to enhance coaching methodology which in turn should be implemented within the coaching group by the Head Coach to improve overall team performance.

Why are 4 coaching assistants in Football Administration and not on the coaching staff?

Job descriptions from the Dolphins would be very useful in answering these questions for me.
 

russdoe

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It enables the defense to intercept the ball in the super bowl on the goal line. Or if you want to cheat, record Jets practices with down and distance and sign players after training camp from teams you play in the first couple weeks of the season.

If you know your opponents plays, the only way to explain it is with analytics.
 

PhinFan1968

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You expect the team to tell you details on everything they're trying to do in order to gain an edge on the opponent? I'm glad they don't.
 

Ray R

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You expect the team to tell you details on everything they're trying to do in order to gain an edge on the opponent? I'm glad they don't.
I'm more interested in their reporting structure.

Developing analytics is easy, but knowing what to do with them is hard and knowing what analytics to develop is even harder. It's like trying to explain what makes up cement when trying to describe a brick wall.
 

rent this space

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I would guess most of this falls under what used to be called quality control, they aren’t assessing players as much as everyone around them. The assistants to coaches sound like coffee runners
 

Ray R

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I would guess most of this falls under what used to be called quality control, they aren’t assessing players as much as everyone around them. The assistants to coaches sound like coffee runners
I agree. That is why having these positions in the "Football Operations" instead of "Coaches" has me both surprised and questioning my own assumptions.
 

illscriptures

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If these positions didnt exist before and they do now I am glad as they are absolutely needed in the modern game.

There should be more off the field prep than on the field.
 

jazz015

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Yes, but I'm wondering about the specifics we are evaluating and what we are trying to learn. Once we have this specific information, who determines what we do with it.

If we are evaluating the players, why aren't we doing it under the coaching staff?

If we are evaluating the coaching, again, why aren't we doing it via the coaching staff? I could see why the football administration would be evaluating a coach's performance, but those evaluations probably do not require "coaching analytics". I would interpret "coaching analytics" as being used to enhance coaching methodology which in turn should be implemented within the coaching group by the Head Coach to improve overall team performance.

Why are 4 coaching assistants in Football Administration and not on the coaching staff?

Job descriptions from the Dolphins would be very useful in answering these questions for me.
The coaching staff doesn t have the time to sift through and write down and chart tendencies. teams either hire firms or employ others to compile the data who then compile it for coaching staff.

What you are trying to spot are trends in your opponents tendencies. A good example is how much more ypc your are gaining against a team in certain formations (think 11 vs nickel defense) Spotting a weakness in these trends helps define a gameplan beyond more than light adjustments in your own.

Another example is spotting whether your own team is more efficient in passes thrown to the tight vs left in a 3rd and medium situation. It has the ability to be reflect and allow coaches to adjust to those specific issues.

It's still a new concept and the NFL is loaded with old coaches who laugh at the idea of it being a thing. But then you see the patriots use it, they know how you think before you walk on the field (hence why they had Gase's number). Belichick then tailors his plan to exploit those specific trends. Granted he sees a lot more than those stats. Its a big reason they struggle the first month of the year, they are still compiling data on their opponents and what they do in the variety of game situations. After that they look superior to most teams in terms of gameplanning.
 

j-off-her-doll

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The coaching staff doesn t have the time to sift through and write down and chart tendencies. teams either hire firms or employ others to compile the data who then compile it for coaching staff.

What you are trying to spot are trends in your opponents tendencies. A good example is how much more ypc your are gaining against a team in certain formations (think 11 vs nickel defense) Spotting a weakness in these trends helps define a gameplan beyond more than light adjustments in your own.

Another example is spotting whether your own team is more efficient in passes thrown to the tight vs left in a 3rd and medium situation. It has the ability to be reflect and allow coaches to adjust to those specific issues.

It's still a new concept and the NFL is loaded with old coaches who laugh at the idea of it being a thing. But then you see the patriots use it, they know how you think before you walk on the field (hence why they had Gase's number). Belichick then tailors his plan to exploit those specific trends. Granted he sees a lot more than those stats. Its a big reason they struggle the first month of the year, they are still compiling data on their opponents and what they do in the variety of game situations. After that they look superior to most teams in terms of gameplanning.
I had not come across that explanation for NE starting slow, but it's very plausible that it's a key factor. Also think they ask more of their players mentally, and it takes them longer to master their responsibilities.
 

hoops

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The coaching staff doesn t have the time to sift through and write down and chart tendencies. teams either hire firms or employ others to compile the data who then compile it for coaching staff.

What you are trying to spot are trends in your opponents tendencies. A good example is how much more ypc your are gaining against a team in certain formations (think 11 vs nickel defense) Spotting a weakness in these trends helps define a gameplan beyond more than light adjustments in your own.

Another example is spotting whether your own team is more efficient in passes thrown to the tight vs left in a 3rd and medium situation. It has the ability to be reflect and allow coaches to adjust to those specific issues.

It's still a new concept and the NFL is loaded with old coaches who laugh at the idea of it being a thing. But then you see the patriots use it, they know how you think before you walk on the field (hence why they had Gase's number). Belichick then tailors his plan to exploit those specific trends. Granted he sees a lot more than those stats. Its a big reason they struggle the first month of the year, they are still compiling data on their opponents and what they do in the variety of game situations. After that they look superior to most teams in terms of gameplanning.

Unless I missed it I’d like to get explanation of what particular advantages belichick and the pats get here? If it’s just situational tendencies the league would adjust real time in season. The best explanation is personnel deficiency or exploitation which drives 90 percent of how teams coordinators attack the opposition
 

jazz015

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Unless I missed it I’d like to get explanation of what particular advantages belichick and the pats get here? If it’s just situational tendencies the league would adjust real time in season. The best explanation is personnel deficiency or exploitation which drives 90 percent of how teams coordinators attack the opposition
It's more of an advantage because a good portion of the league is just catching on to analytics. Not many teams ever believed in using it until the eagles made it mainstream after the super bowl win.

You would think that most coaches would exploit those weaknesses inherently, but using the Cowboys/Seahawks playoff game. You can see that a good portion of coaches have no idea how to maximize every opprotunity that can be presented to them for winning
 

Ray R

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I see a lot of responses where "analytics" is treated as a known item. I don't think we know. We can guess at what they are doing but that doesn't really tell us what is going on. Analytics is a general term and could mean almost anything.

I would like to know the what "analytics" are being developed. I do not see listing this information as jeopardizing any competitive advantage we could get without also including how we use those "analytics". Knowing what is being measured doesn't give anything away to other teams that they don't already have access to.

I am most interested in the why this group of specialists and assistants are in listed under the Football Administration side of management and not the Coaching side, so let me reiterate:

1) Why are the "analytics" people listed under Football Administration and not under the Coaching staff?

2) What are the "analytics" measuring? Clearly Coaching "analytics" does not measure the same thing as Personnel "analytics", so just saying "analytics" doesn't really convey much information since it is such a general term!

3) Why are Coaching Assistants listed under Football Administration instead of being listed under coaching? Shouldn't they be under the Head Coach or one of the coaches on the coaching staff?

4) Why is a Strength and Conditioning Assistant listed under Football Administration instead of being listed under the strength and conditioning coach? Wouldn't he work directly under the Head Strength and Conditioning?

The fact that there are at least 8 people under the Football Administration group that I feel should be under the Coaching group leaves me doubtful about how well organized the overall structure of the Dolphins operations is and I am an optimist.
 

TedSlimmJr

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I see a lot of responses where "analytics" is treated as a known item. I don't think we know. We can guess at what they are doing but that doesn't really tell us what is going on. Analytics is a general term and could mean almost anything.

I would like to know the what "analytics" are being developed. I do not see listing this information as jeopardizing any competitive advantage we could get without also including how we use those "analytics". Knowing what is being measured doesn't give anything away to other teams that they don't already have access to.

I am most interested in the why this group of specialists and assistants are in listed under the Football Administration side of management and not the Coaching side, so let me reiterate:

1) Why are the "analytics" people listed under Football Administration and not under the Coaching staff?

2) What are the "analytics" measuring? Clearly Coaching "analytics" does not measure the same thing as Personnel "analytics", so just saying "analytics" doesn't really convey much information since it is such a general term!

3) Why are Coaching Assistants listed under Football Administration instead of being listed under coaching? Shouldn't they be under the Head Coach or one of the coaches on the coaching staff?

4) Why is a Strength and Conditioning Assistant listed under Football Administration instead of being listed under the strength and conditioning coach? Wouldn't he work directly under the Head Strength and Conditioning?

The fact that there are at least 8 people under the Football Administration group that I feel should be under the Coaching group leaves me doubtful about how well organized the overall structure of the Dolphins operations is and I am an optimist.

Because they typically don't have any direct interaction with the players. They're simply there to analyze film based on specialized situations.

"Assistant coaches" don't always coach the players. Nowdays, everything is specialized. A lot of times you basically have two coaches at every position.

For example, in college football you're only allowed to have so many coaches on staff - coaches that are allowed to actually interact with the players, and recruit. But there's no limit on the number of "analysts" you can have. Because they're not coaching the players. They're simply walking, living, breathing databases that are earning a paycheck charting statistics.

It's similar to how Saban hired former head coaches like Lane Kiffin or Butch Jones or D.J. Durkin as analysts to be on his staff when they needed a job. The best coaches are always on the cutting edge of evolution.

Conversely, the other side of it is how Brian Flores and the Dolphins hired Coach Farrell away from Saban and Alabama a few months ago. Farrell was assistant special teams coach/offensive analyst under Saban. But he couldn't recruit or interact with the players on the field. However, Saban and Flores felt that he was ready to take the next step in his coaching career and begin teaching techniques. A lot of young coaches and/or former players might not have teaching skills yet - but they understand the ins and outs of playing a specific position. In a lot of ways, it's just a way to get former players into coaching. It's kinda what used to be referred to as a GA (graduate assistant) back in the day. That's how you got your start into coaching in my day. You didn't have analysts.
 
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