What Makes Penei Sewell a Generational Tackle | Film study | FinHeaven - Miami Dolphins Forums

What Makes Penei Sewell a Generational Tackle | Film study

"Fitzmagic"

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I love him but would rather have Pitts or Chase, especially since it looks like we are not looking to land an Alpha WR in FA. But I would not be pissed as in many other years. One of Pitts, Sewell or Chase and I am smiling on Draft Night.
 

SF Dolphin Fan

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If Miami stays at three, they have some exciting choices.

Sewell's is probably the best player in the draft. I just don't see the Dolphins going that way. But that would definitely improve the offensive line.

Would that open up the possibility of trading Jackson, or would Miami simply move Hunt inside and put Sewell at RT?

Pitts and Gesicki in the redzone is something to dream on. He was probably the single biggest mismatch im college football.

Smith and Chase would greatly upgrade the receiver room.
 

Gatorboy999120

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If Miami stays at three, they have some exciting choices.

Sewell's is probably the best player in the draft. I just don't see the Dolphins going that way. But that would definitely improve the offensive line.

Would that open up the possibility of trading Jackson, or would Miami simply move Hunt inside and put Sewell at RT?

Pitts and Gesicki in the redzone is something to dream on. He was probably the single biggest mismatch im college football.

Smith and Chase would greatly upgrade the receiver room.
He may be the best player now but not the most upside or biggest HOF POTENTIAL..that is and will continue to be kyle Pitts
 

ckparrothead

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How the hell can a tackle be "generational" when he never really faced any NFL caliber pass rushers his whole time in college?

I get that he's a really good athlete and impressive. The guy in the video says the term generational is over-used, and then he uses it for a guy whose signature pass pro wins were against...Bradlee Anae?

I love Penei Sewell and I'd love to have him on my team. But let's not pretend his pass pro (which will be his primary job as a franchise tackle) is proven. The video showed some of the warts there, even against college players. He can be beaten around outside, which I think Zack Baun did. He can be beaten to the inside.

Penei Sewell is not Greg Robinson, let me be clear about that, but one mistake people made about Greg Robinson was labeling him with these gaudy accolades and calling him a #2 overall pick and such without having seen even a little bit whether his pass pro would hold up in the NFL. In Gus Malzahn's offense he rarely sat back in pass pro. On the occasions he did, he wasn't exactly batting a thousand, either.

Always have to keep in mind that's going to be his job as a franchise tackle. If he's going to be known as "generational" it's going to be because he was an unassailable pass protector. It's sort of like what I remind people about tight end prospects when they get too caught up in blocking. In today's NFL the great tight ends are the great tight ends because of what they do in the passing game, not blocking (see: Kelce, Travis).

Again, Sewell is a good looking prospect. I think there's something to it when Pach criticizes his consistency in finishing blocks. I also think there's something to it when we note he can be beaten in pass pro. I just don't understand using terms like "generational" because of fancy looking screen blocks, as opposed to having faced legit pass rushers and shut them all down in pass pro.
 

Awsi Dooger

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I saw a couple of tweets by PFF last week that I agree with. They said that in the current NFL the optimum level for offensive line is to be average to good. Anything beyond that is diminishing returns.

That's the problem I have with spending the third pick on this guy, no matter how good he is. It seems like you would be ignoring balance beam realities in deference to some fanciful notion of wow we now have a protector for a decade.

It's not a cheap decade, especially for a guy who begins at #3 overall. If he pans out then that second contract demand is going to be massive. And it's easy to project the situational gullibility if you have a top pick tackle who turns out to be a great player. All of a sudden the performance gap to nearby players will be so dramatic you'll itch to boost those spots also. Let's do that with another high pick. Hey, it worked the first time. Like Pete Carroll says once you make an exception to a proven and logical formula, it becomes a team of exceptions.

I wouldn't do it. The recent Dolphins make separation at wide receiver more difficult than it is, and average to good across the offensive line more difficult than it is. Scoreboard needs to be the priority, and a positional-direct priority not a positional-rationalized priority.

PFF said the important thing at offensive line is not to be awful. A year or two ago I remember posting similarly, that offensive line is like a swimming race in which it doesn't matter if you lose the touch to everyone else in the pool. Just don't be lapped.
 

Gatorboy999120

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I saw a couple of tweets by PFF last week that I agree with. They said that in the current NFL the optimum level for offensive line is to be average to good. Anything beyond that is diminishing returns.

That's the problem I have with spending the third pick on this guy, no matter how good he is. It seems like you would be ignoring balance beam realities in deference to some fanciful notion of wow we now have a protector for a decade.

It's not a cheap decade, especially for a guy who begins at #3 overall. If he pans out then that second contract demand is going to be massive. And it's easy to project the situational gullibility if you have a top pick tackle who turns out to be a great player. All of a sudden the performance gap to nearby players will be so dramatic you'll itch to boost those spots also. Let's do that with another high pick. Hey, it worked the first time. Like Pete Carroll says once you make an exception to a proven and logical formula, it becomes a team of exceptions.

I wouldn't do it. The recent Dolphins make separation at wide receiver more difficult than it is, and average to good across the offensive line more difficult than it is. Scoreboard needs to be the priority, and a positional-direct priority not a positional-rationalized priority.

PFF said the important thing at offensive line is not to be awful. A year or two ago I remember posting similarly, that offensive line is like a swimming race in which it doesn't matter if you lose the touch to everyone else in the pool. Just don't be lapped.
Well said...I'm sure many will disagree to disagree..but I get it!
 

Fin Thirteen

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I saw a couple of tweets by PFF last week that I agree with. They said that in the current NFL the optimum level for offensive line is to be average to good. Anything beyond that is diminishing returns.

That's the problem I have with spending the third pick on this guy, no matter how good he is. It seems like you would be ignoring balance beam realities in deference to some fanciful notion of wow we now have a protector for a decade.

It's not a cheap decade, especially for a guy who begins at #3 overall. If he pans out then that second contract demand is going to be massive. And it's easy to project the situational gullibility if you have a top pick tackle who turns out to be a great player. All of a sudden the performance gap to nearby players will be so dramatic you'll itch to boost those spots also. Let's do that with another high pick. Hey, it worked the first time. Like Pete Carroll says once you make an exception to a proven and logical formula, it becomes a team of exceptions.

I wouldn't do it. The recent Dolphins make separation at wide receiver more difficult than it is, and average to good across the offensive line more difficult than it is. Scoreboard needs to be the priority, and a positional-direct priority not a positional-rationalized priority.

PFF said the important thing at offensive line is not to be awful. A year or two ago I remember posting similarly, that offensive line is like a swimming race in which it doesn't matter if you lose the touch to everyone else in the pool. Just don't be lapped.
That's a very interesting take, that I hadn't heard expressed before. I think though that there's a massive variance in what it is that makes your particular offensive line "average" versus other teams'.

Not all average lines are created equal i would say. For example, a line that pass protects generally well but is prone to collapse or allow pressure on certain types of defensive plays is probably a lot easier to manage than a line that is barely containing the dline every pass snap, but rarely collapses fully. Both are average but they're not the same thing.

That's before we even consider lines that excel in the pass and are lousy in the run and vice versa. The permutations are pretty extensive.

In Miami's case, we have the latter type of line above where our tackles, and Jackson in particular, are conceding ground in pass pro on nearly every set, making a pocket that's more a narrow claustrophobic V than a nice cosy U. The QB is feeling some form of "hurry" on nearly every snap, without it necessarily becoming a stat on a sheet.

Now comes the situational awareness you have been talking about recently. We have a QB whose specific shortcoming is patience in the pocket to allow routes develop. A pocket that rarely ever facilitates that patience is suddenly a big problem. Miami would be much better off with a different sort of "average" line. You can now see how all "average" lines are not created equal.

This isn't an ad for Penei Sewell. It's a deep tackle class if you wanted someone to push/replace your very young and highly drafted LT.

But I'm quite sure there are other "average" lines out there who's profile lends itself to today's game better than Miami's and to our young QB in particular (and - thinking about it - to the type of receivers we have so far).

We need to sort out the issue of how regularly our pocket shrinks significantly. My personal opinion watching the games is that Jackson is the biggest culprit. I hope he's going to make a big year 2 leap, but I'd be happier to have some real competition in there for him.
 
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Bopkin02

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That's a very interesting take, that I hadn't heard expressed before. I think though that there's a massive variance in what it is that makes your particular offensive line "average" versus other teams'.

Not all average lines are created equal i would say. For example, a line that pass protects generally well but is prone to collapse or allow pressure on certain types of defensive plays is probably a lot easier to manage than a line that is barely containing the dline every pass snap, but rarely collapses fully. Both are average but they're not the same thing.

That's before we even consider lines that excel in the pass and are lousy in the run and vice versa. The permutations are pretty extensive.

In Miami's case, we have the latter type of line above where our tackles, and Jackson in particular, are conceding ground in pass pro on nearly every set, making a pocket that's more a narrow claustrophobic V than a nice cosy U. The QB is feeling some form of "hurry" on nearly every snap, without it necessarily becoming a stat on a sheet.

Now comes the situational awareness you have been talking about recently. We have a QB whose specific shortcoming is patience in the pocket to allow routes develop. A pocket that rarely ever facilitates that patience is suddenly a big problem. Miami would be much better off with a different sort of "average" line. You can now see how all "average" lines are not created equal.

This isn't an ad for Penei Sewell. It's a deep tackle class if you wanted someone to push/replace your very young and highly drafted LT.

But I'm quite sure there are other "average" lines out there who's profile lends itself to today's game better than Miami's and to our young QB in particular (and - thinking about it - to the type of receivers we have so far).

We need to sort out the issue of how regularly our pocket shrinks significantly. My personal opinion watching the games is that Jackson is the biggest culprit. I hope he's going to make a big year 2 leap, but I'd be happier to have some real competition in there for him.
Wow great post.
 

Bopkin02

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I saw a couple of tweets by PFF last week that I agree with. They said that in the current NFL the optimum level for offensive line is to be average to good. Anything beyond that is diminishing returns.

That's the problem I have with spending the third pick on this guy, no matter how good he is. It seems like you would be ignoring balance beam realities in deference to some fanciful notion of wow we now have a protector for a decade.

It's not a cheap decade, especially for a guy who begins at #3 overall. If he pans out then that second contract demand is going to be massive. And it's easy to project the situational gullibility if you have a top pick tackle who turns out to be a great player. All of a sudden the performance gap to nearby players will be so dramatic you'll itch to boost those spots also. Let's do that with another high pick. Hey, it worked the first time. Like Pete Carroll says once you make an exception to a proven and logical formula, it becomes a team of exceptions.

I wouldn't do it. The recent Dolphins make separation at wide receiver more difficult than it is, and average to good across the offensive line more difficult than it is. Scoreboard needs to be the priority, and a positional-direct priority not a positional-rationalized priority.

PFF said the important thing at offensive line is not to be awful. A year or two ago I remember posting similarly, that offensive line is like a swimming race in which it doesn't matter if you lose the touch to everyone else in the pool. Just don't be lapped.
Also, great post.
I would love to see more debate on these theses by posters who really know what they are talking about. Just to get a back and forth.
But unfortunately, we will probably not ever get that.
Still, fascinating take.
 

Pachyderm_Wave

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The generational tag was applied to Sewell in terms of what typically comes through the Oregon football program - as he was an All-American immediately as a true freshman. Not generational in terms of what comes through every football program.

I think it was just allowed to take off without anyone to outline what they really meant.
 
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