Slimm's 2018 Quarterbacks (Seniors)

Discussion in 'NFL Draft Forum' started by TedSlimmJr, May 4, 2017.

  1. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    My goodness. Seriously. Get a look at this game from South Dakota QB Chris Streveler.



    What a deadly release.
     
  2. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    I'd love for Slimm to weigh in on whether Streveler's mechanical perversions are just too much to make it at the next level. Certainly they're there. But we've seen other perversions succeed in varying degrees.
     
  3. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    I'm not very familiar with the kid, but just from watching the game you have there I don't necessarily see any mechanical red flags...nothing that I would determine to preclude him from having a shot to be successful at the next level. That release can make up for a lot of flaws anyway, as you alluded to.

    He looks like a pretty good athlete for the position. Although one thing I don't see him do is throw to his left. That's the most difficult throw for a right hander, that's really where footwork has to be precise.

    He looks like he'd get picked off a lot to me if he played at the FBS level. Looks like he'd throw a high number of interceptions...similar to Tanner Lee.
     
  4. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    The mechanical issues I see are that he doesn't lead with his feet often enough, and the ball seems to come out at a pretty oblique angle relative to his shoulders. He's got a strong arm and quick release, but he's not getting much hip rotation, and from what I've seen in multiple games that is leading to this odd dynamic where he throws with NFL caliber zip at intermediate levels but can't consistently heft the ball at long distances (50+ yards).

    He was at Minnesota and couldn't beat Mitch Leidner, so he volunteered to make use of his athleticism by moving to wide receiver. Eventually he transferred out to South Dakota, played QB last year and this year, and so he's a little inexperienced and unrefined. I think there's enough there to want to keep working with him. He's arguably the most dominant player in FCS football right now.
     
  5. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    Yep, see what you're saying. Tries to throw all arm and doesn't get his lower body involved. Typical of a kid who's very strong in the upper body but underdeveloped strength wise in the core or lower body. Takes me back to how Brady Quinn threw the ball coming out of ND.

    Didn't know he was at Minnesota. Yeah that's saying something if he couldn't beat out Mitch Leidner in my opinion.
     
  6. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Kurt Benkert reminds me of Jim Harbaugh as a QB.
     
  7. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    I am surprised how much I like Bryan Schor of James Madison.
     
  8. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Brandon Silvers versus Bryan Schor is a really interesting battle.

    Offensively they're both doing similar things and there's a lot there to like in terms of translation, information processing, running a huddle and an offense, making calls and adjustments, etc.

    From a leadership standpoint Brandon Silvers stands out because of how he plays against opponents that should overwhelm him, like LSU this year or Clemson last year. Then again, you look at Bryan Schor and the fact he won the FCS National Championship after a near perfect playoff performance, and the guy is undefeated this year. He did beat a FBS team this year for what that's worth. And last year he scored 28 points on North Carolina. Can't exactly help it if his FCS defense decided to give up 56 points to Mitch Trubisky's squad. He's working with FCS receivers and FCS linemen against UNC's high recruits and he jumped out to a 21-14 lead on UNC in the first half.

    Brandon Silvers stands out for his ability to manipulate defenses with his eyes, and anticipate tight windows opening up. This is a key trait for him. On the other hand, Bryan Schor stands out for his ability to make plays when the play breaks down, finding guys on the scramble. That's a key trait for him.

    I would say that Brandon Silvers throws the football with a little more pepper on it, especially on the short to intermediate throws, although I would not say that's the greatest thing because his prioritization on zip sees him throwing a hard to catch football sometimes. Schor has better manipulation of touch, can get the ball up over an underneath defender and down into a zone, and throws a bit more catchable on short to intermediate distances.

    But is Schor's arm strength inferior to Silvers? I don't think so.



    You don't make that throw, which has to be something like 58 yards through the air at a dead run, rolling right and throwing across your body, and not floating the ball at all, if you've got an inferior arm.

    Silvers has a bit more of a stout build, but he's not quite as athletic as Schor, who can definitely outrun some people with his legs.

    In terms of decision-making, they can both be risky with the football at times. But when Brandon Silvers is getting caught on a bad decision, I feel like he falls into the trap a lot of guys do when they use their eyes to manipulate defenses, which is coming back to the throw they wanted and throwing into it blind. When Bryan Schor is being risky with the football, it's usually just him being aggressive down the field trying to make a play.
     
  9. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    I'm not sure about Bryan Schor or how he compares to anybody I haven't looked at him, but I want to point out the details you illustrated here in regards to Brandon Silvers are spot on. That's well done.
     
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  10. TedSlimmJr

    TedSlimmJr Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

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    Benkert has physical skills that can be developed for the next level, but he's in dire need of some top notch QB coaching. He's a fundamental mess.

    However, he displays two things that you can't coach...toughness and arm talent.

    He'll stand in there until the last second and stare down the barrel of a blitzer to deliver the pass in key situations. Problem is, he's more tough than he is savvy at this point. Holds the ball too long and often takes some unnecessary punishment before deciding to throw it away....especially when his primary read isn't open.

    Gets antsy in the pocket, I'd like to see him become more calm and relay more poise to his team. Forgets to set his feet when he throws on the move which causes his accuracy and ball placement to drop off.

    Lot of details he needs to clean up in order to become a starter at the next level.

    Also needs some work on handoffs...doesn't always seat the ball properly to the back.

    He reminds me of Austin Davis coming out of Southern Miss. He may get cut a time or two in camp at first until he's able to iron out all his flaws with the right coaching and reps before eventually securing a roster spot as a backup.
     
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  11. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    Nice FCS QB battle this weekend between South Dakota's Chris Streveler and Sam Houston State's Jeremiah Briscoe.

    As I've said, I favor Streveler quite a bit as a project for the next level. He's very big and strong, very athletic having a history of playing wide receiver at Minnesota. With his build, athletic ability, and toughness, you're almost tempted to throw him in at a different position. But he's been a dominant passer since joining South Dakota and he seems to be making improvements on his stroke in real time as he gets more and more game experience.

    The short explanation of why you're drawn to him would be because his release is the quickest in the game, he can throw a very hot ball with accuracy, has the patience and physical confidence to stand in the pocket and deliver the football with lots of physical threats coming at him, and then he can hurt you with his legs and physical strength.

    There's a confidence that bigger, physically strong guys sometimes have in the pocket with trash being thrown around them all over the place. He has that.

    His offense isn't anything to write home about in terms of translation, but two things I like about it are his ability get from one side of the field to the other in his reads, and his complete comfort with a blur-caliber hurry-up.

    Another thing I like is that the guy shows a natural sense for when to throw the football with charged up pace, and when to throw a very catchable ball. When I initially looked at him in 2016, I actually didn't think he had a very strong arm, but that was because I was watching throws where he was deliberately throwing catchable footballs with some arc. I mentioned that Brandon Silvers at times has taken to driving the ball so hard that it really takes away from how catchable his throws are. I would say Streveler has a better, more natural sense for when to drill it and when to throw it.

    The competitiveness with him is very high. He exudes it. South Dakota has not been a good football program over the years. But they started out the year beating an FBS team (Bowling Green) and then beating the team that played in the FCS Championship Game last year (Bo Pelini's Youngstown State). They won seven games this year which I don't think they had done as a program in over a decade. They lost steam toward the end of the season, dropping three straight against UNI, NDSU, and SDSU, but they played in the first round of the FCS Playoffs last weekend and beat Nicholls on Streveler's 25 of 37 for 378 yards, 4 TDs and 1 INT.

    The mechanics are a bit wonky at times, throwing all arm without much follow through or hip rotation. There are times when the ball comes out at a funny angle relative to his shoulder aiming. But I think you can continue to work with him on his feet, because that's where it all starts, and I think there's a possibility that a number of years from now any remaining idiosyncracies seem pretty benign.

    Clean him up just a little more and what you're left with is a guy with a lightning quick release throwing a hot ball when necessary but also having a natural feel for throwing with touch, standing in the pocket with toughness and confidence, and making plays with his legs.

    From there you're just hoping he's not absolutely clueless learning an NFL playbook, handling a huddle and protection calls, reading leverage, throwing option routes, and seeing the game at a much faster speed. That's a big leap of faith, but you could do a LOT worse than his tools and traits for a project player.
     
  12. Stills&Landry

    Stills&Landry Well-Known Member

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    I've been watching Riley Ferguson lately since I like his numbers, measurables, the fact he started out in TN, the offenses he has played at have been very pro-like, has experience under center, he's likely to be available later, etc, etc...

    Even in his good games, I see poor mechanics in his shorter throws mostly. He delivers the ball too far down his arc. He doesn't give his short throws much of an arc either. I think he 's trying to quicken his release but by stretching it all the way to his chest he's negating any advantage. Lots of his shorter passes get batted down because of this too. No touch either. Not a very catchable ball.

    His deep ball is money though when he sets up properly.

    He plays with urgency, is a good scrambler, stays in the pocket, while a good runner he looks to pass first and foremost, but sometimes he'll look like he's playing too fast. He's at his best when he sets but he doesn't do this enough. Good footwork though, he looks frenetic out there.

    He's a leader and a competitor, decided to transfer rather than stay at TN as a backup after getting injured.

    IMO the tools are there, both physically and mentally but will still need a lot of work with mechanics and gaining more poise in the pocket. He could add some weight, that would probably scrape some of his athletic ability but he'd be less afraid of contact and would probably need to scramble less either way.

    If given time and a good situation he could be a productive starter in the league. If forced to start in a bad team early in his career that will ruin his confidence and he'll bust as he becomes flustered.
     
  13. ckparrothead

    ckparrothead Premium Member

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    For me, Baker Mayfield and Riley Ferguson are the only two senior QBs in this draft that I could take and be relatively confident I got someone that will start games on Sunday.

    Others feel that way about Mason Rudolph. He's not for me. It isn't that I wouldn't take him at any level. It's just that I'm not likely to prioritize him until Day 3. Pretty good arm, obviously great size. But he's a big, stationary target in the pocket. Only adequate feet, slow movement within the pocket. Can't do much of anything when forced off his spot. There are guys in past drafts that I've been high on that look a lot like this (almost invariably a mistake for me to be high on them) but at least those guys had Looney Tunes arm strength and/or ridiculous accuracy at distance. Mason Rudolph earns neither accolade.

    Setting aside the underclass, I think my QB strategy would be to go for Baker Mayfield or Riley Ferguson at their market price, or if I were to swing and miss the market on those two, eschew the middling guys (Mason Rudolph, Luke Falk, Matt Linehan, Kurt Benkert, Max Browne, Jeremiah Briscoe, J.T. Barrett) in favor of Bryan Schor, Chris Streveler, Brandon Silvers, Dalton Sturm, or Logan Woodside. Probably in that order.

    That gets blown up a little when you stick the underclass in there because suddenly ou've got a guy in Josh Rosen that should probably go #1 overall. You've got guys in Josh Allen and Lamar Jackson that I'm perfectly comfortable spending a Day 2 pick on. And you've got some legit Day 3 players to add to the pile in Ryan Finley, Tanner Lee, and Clayton Thorson. I know those guys would go ahead of Silvers, Sturm, and Woodside for me. Haven't yet decided on Schor or Streveler.
     
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  14. Stills&Landry

    Stills&Landry Well-Known Member

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    I do like Falk, Linehan and Benkert. What do you all think of Lock?
     
  15. ANUFan

    ANUFan A True Fan Donator

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    I really like the way the Mayfield kid plays.
     

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