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Any change in Tua/OC's game?

NBP81

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Couple of notes about the Fins passing game compared to last year when Tua started.

  • IAY(average intended air yards): 9.4 yards(7th) compared to 7.7 last season. While almost 2 full yards is sort of a big deal, I do remember Tua being close to top 5 in this category after 3-4 games last season so Im not as surprised to see this as some might be. Important to note here is that the offense toned down a bit after that and Tua fell ways down that he finished the season in the bottom half of the league. Is this something the Fins want or is it something they'll try and make Tua slow down on? Or is it flat out the reason Chan is gone? It'll be interesting to see if the offense keeps this up.

  • AGG%: 25.9%(4th) compared to 20.3% last year. Now this stat is easy to misinterpret because it involves alot of moving parts, the willingness of a QB to throw into tight windows and the ability of the receiving options to gain separation on any given play. Was kind of surprised to see this as I thought the fact the Fins added alot of wiggle in the receiving room might lower the number of hard throws the QB had to make this year. Either the new additions arent created as much separation as hoped or Tua has grown more comfortable with tight windows.

  • So how did the Fins WRs do in SEP? 2 Dolphins qualified with enough targets to be shown in nextgen's chart. Jaylen Waddle posted a 3.6 yards average separation on his targets while Parker did his usual 2.1. For reference sake, the leader in SEP for the Fins last season was Jakeem Grant with an average of 3.1 yards of separation per targets. Parker got 7 targets while Waddle got 6. It does look like Tua was more comfortable with NFL open in the NE game.

  • AYTS(average air yards to the sticks): This is another category where Tua started strong and lost some ground as the season went along. In the NE he actually threw the ball 0.6 past the sticks(8th) compared to 0.8 yards short of the sticks last year.

  • TT(time to throw): Nothing new here, 2.58 seconds to throw(9th) on average compared to 2.55 last season. I can confidently tell you that Tua isnt taking too long going through his reads.

TLDR; *Fins passing game was more aggressive by a good margin playing on the road in NE than it was last year. *The WRs are more diverse giving the QB more options. *This strategy netted +1.2 yards of effeciency per attempt. Which is very nice, because of you now, the tendency of teams throwing for a 6.6 YPA in NE on average.
 

PhinFan1968

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Couple of notes about the Fins passing game compared to last year when Tua started.

  • IAY(average intended air yards): 9.4 yards(7th) compared to 7.7 last season. While almost 2 full yards is sort of a big deal, I do remember Tua being close to top 5 in this category after 3-4 games last season so Im not as surprised to see this as some might be. Important to note here is that the offense toned down a bit after that and Tua fell ways down that he finished the season in the bottom half of the league. Is this something the Fins want or is it something they'll try and make Tua slow down on? Or is it flat out the reason Chan is gone? It'll be interesting to see if the offense keeps this up.

  • AGG%: 25.9%(4th) compared to 20.3% last year. Now this stat is easy to misinterpret because it involves alot of moving parts, the willingness of a QB to throw into tight windows and the ability of the receiving options to gain separation on any given play. Was kind of surprised to see this as I thought the fact the Fins added alot of wiggle in the receiving room might lower the number of hard throws the QB had to make this year. Either the new additions arent created as much separation as hoped or Tua has grown more comfortable with tight windows.

  • So how did the Fins WRs do in SEP? 2 Dolphins qualified with enough targets to be shown in nextgen's chart. Jaylen Waddle posted a 3.6 yards average separation on his targets while Parker did his usual 2.1. For reference sake, the leader in SEP for the Fins last season was Jakeem Grant with an average of 3.1 yards of separation per targets. Parker got 7 targets while Waddle got 6. It does look like Tua was more comfortable with NFL open in the NE game.

  • AYTS(average air yards to the sticks): This is another category where Tua started strong and lost some ground as the season went along. In the NE he actually threw the ball 0.6 past the sticks(8th) compared to 0.8 yards short of the sticks last year.

  • TT(time to throw): Nothing new here, 2.58 seconds to throw(9th) on average compared to 2.55 last season. I can confidently tell you that Tua isnt taking too long going through his reads.

TLDR; *Fins passing game was more aggressive by a good margin playing on the road in NE than it was last year. *The WRs are more diverse giving the QB more options. *This strategy netted +1.2 yards of effeciency per attempt. Which is very nice, because of you now, the tendency of teams throwing for a 6.6 YPA in NE on average.
Excellent. Love seeing stuff that backs up what I thought I saw…wasn’t wearing my glasses, after all.
 

NBP81

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His time to throw was 9th best in week 1? Is that as in “had that much time”? I suggested he had some clean pockets at times and when he did he was very accurate.
TT is actual time between snap and throw. Doesnt tell you if its by design or because of pressure. Considering Tua was top 10 last year, I'd lean on Tua gets rid of the ball in a timely manner most ofthe time.
 

ThePeopleShow13

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His time to throw was 9th best in week 1? Is that as in “had that much time”? I suggested he had some clean pockets at times and when he did he was very accurate.
As stated above me, it means how long he takes to throw the ball after the snap. Having a quick time to throw simply means he gets the ball out (at that rate). It’s kind of a tricky stat to analyze because it’s a combination of a QBs ability to go through reads and how their offense is designed. Guys like Lamar Jackson or Kyler Murray tend to get the ball out “slow” because they have a tendency to extend plays. It’s kind of an interesting stat because every qualifying QB in the NFL was within ~8 tenths of a second (2.3-3.09) of each other week 1.
 
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Fin-Loco

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Couple of notes about the Fins passing game compared to last year when Tua started.

  • IAY(average intended air yards): 9.4 yards(7th) compared to 7.7 last season. While almost 2 full yards is sort of a big deal, I do remember Tua being close to top 5 in this category after 3-4 games last season so Im not as surprised to see this as some might be. Important to note here is that the offense toned down a bit after that and Tua fell ways down that he finished the season in the bottom half of the league. Is this something the Fins want or is it something they'll try and make Tua slow down on? Or is it flat out the reason Chan is gone? It'll be interesting to see if the offense keeps this up.

  • AGG%: 25.9%(4th) compared to 20.3% last year. Now this stat is easy to misinterpret because it involves alot of moving parts, the willingness of a QB to throw into tight windows and the ability of the receiving options to gain separation on any given play. Was kind of surprised to see this as I thought the fact the Fins added alot of wiggle in the receiving room might lower the number of hard throws the QB had to make this year. Either the new additions arent created as much separation as hoped or Tua has grown more comfortable with tight windows.

  • So how did the Fins WRs do in SEP? 2 Dolphins qualified with enough targets to be shown in nextgen's chart. Jaylen Waddle posted a 3.6 yards average separation on his targets while Parker did his usual 2.1. For reference sake, the leader in SEP for the Fins last season was Jakeem Grant with an average of 3.1 yards of separation per targets. Parker got 7 targets while Waddle got 6. It does look like Tua was more comfortable with NFL open in the NE game.

  • AYTS(average air yards to the sticks): This is another category where Tua started strong and lost some ground as the season went along. In the NE he actually threw the ball 0.6 past the sticks(8th) compared to 0.8 yards short of the sticks last year.

  • TT(time to throw): Nothing new here, 2.58 seconds to throw(9th) on average compared to 2.55 last season. I can confidently tell you that Tua isnt taking too long going through his reads.

TLDR; *Fins passing game was more aggressive by a good margin playing on the road in NE than it was last year. *The WRs are more diverse giving the QB more options. *This strategy netted +1.2 yards of effeciency per attempt. Which is very nice, because of you now, the tendency of teams throwing for a 6.6 YPA in NE on average.
Great post. Where do you pull these stats from?
 

GhostArmOfMarino

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As stated above me, it means how long he takes to throw the ball after the snap. Having a quick time to throw simply means he gets the ball out (at that rate). It’s kind of a tricky stat to analyze because it’s a combination of a QBs ability to go through reads and how their offense is designed. Guys like Lamar Jackson or Kyler Murray tend to get the ball out “slow” because they have a tendency to extend plays. It’s kind of an interesting stat because every qualifying QB in the NFL was within ~8 tenths of a second (2.3-3.09) of each other week 1.

Not saying this is the case, but it can also mean you aren't allowing enough plays to develop in some cases.

Again not saying this applies here necessarily, just that it is a consideration in some cases.
 
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Until this past Sunday I had not watched Tua play an entire game for the Dolphins. However , before the game I me a Dolphins fan who told me a criticism of Tua's play had been that he holds onto the ball too long. So, against the Patriots I was expecting to see same however it looked to me like Tua's release was quick, just fine.
When Tua played during the 2020 season was holding the ball too long a common criticism ?
 

SCOTTY

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Until this past Sunday I had not watched Tua play an entire game for the Dolphins. However , before the game I me a Dolphins fan who told me a criticism of Tua's play had been that he holds onto the ball too long. So, against the Patriots I was expecting to see same however it looked to me like Tua's release was quick, just fine.
When Tua played during the 2020 season was holding the ball too long a common criticism ?
I think it was a correlation of people saying he held the ball too long/he wasn't throwing to NFL open receivers.
I anticipate his release time to continue to drop throughout the season as we move more towards slants and RPO quick hits
 
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I think it was a correlation of people saying he held the ball too long/he wasn't throwing to NFL open receivers.
I anticipate his release time to continue to drop throughout the season as we move more towards slants and RPO quick hits

Tua looked comfortable throwing the short slant passes against the Patriots. I am hoping for more of the same against the Bills.
 

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As stated above me, it means how long he takes to throw the ball after the snap. Having a quick time to throw simply means he gets the ball out (at that rate). It’s kind of a tricky stat to analyze because it’s a combination of a QBs ability to go through reads and how their offense is designed. Guys like Lamar Jackson or Kyler Murray tend to get the ball out “slow” because they have a tendency to extend plays. It’s kind of an interesting stat because every qualifying QB in the NFL was within ~8 tenths of a second (2.3-3.09) of each other week 1.
The stat that is most used is "time to throw before pressure". Miami was second to last this past year, only worse than the Chargers.

I'd take 9th in time before pressure in a heartbeat.
 

PhinFan1968

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I think it was a correlation of people saying he held the ball too long/he wasn't throwing to NFL open receivers.
I anticipate his release time to continue to drop throughout the season as we move more towards slants and RPO quick hits
I feel like the offense isn’t on the same page yet. There were some route concepts last week that interfered with each other, or had multiple targets in the same area. It’s going to take time to fix, and while Tua would never admit it publicly, I believe some WRs/TEs weren’t where they were supposed to be on some plays…miscommunication, misreads, whatever…needs to be ironed out.
 

artdnj

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I feel like the offense isn’t on the same page yet. There were some route concepts last week that interfered with each other, or had multiple targets in the same area. It’s going to take time to fix, and while Tua would never admit it publicly, I believe some WRs/TEs weren’t where they were supposed to be on some plays…miscommunication, misreads, whatever…needs to be ironed out.
I also think the offense we see for the next few games won't be the same offense we see by week 6 or so on. We have the soldiers to form one hell of a strike force unit.
 
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